What is it? Set 551

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I need some help with 3217, 3219, and 3220 in this week's set:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Larger images:
http://imgur.com/gallery/IMD6q/new
Rob
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3217: Must be a nail puller, eih? ;>)}
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On 6/26/2014 3:43 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Did we ever get the answers from last week?
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I haven't looked, but given your track record, I would think you would be keeping a low profile about this (did you look?)
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Stormy, most newsreaders can display only the new posts, and most have filters to mark certain posters' messages for attention.
If it's so important, why not employ some of those tools?
As always, Rob gave the answers.
Lloyd
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Could be! Someone else suggested it was pin puller. Thanks for the post!
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    Posting from the usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3217)    Looks like a tool for pulling difficult to extract nails.
3218)    A wire stripper -- for heavy gauge wires. Looks like it bolts     down to a workbench, and it has small ratchet wrench as the     operating lever -- with a knob added to the handle.
3219)    It looks more like an operating lever which clamps onto a shaft     (likely on a machine tool) instead of a tool in its own right.
3220)    It looks to me to be an adaptor for something like a theodolite     or transit to a tripod. Likely one which is rather more     portable than most, based on how it folds up -- and on the     relatively small size. (Unless that is a scaled-up quarter of     reference. :-)
    The three points receive three hollow cone adjustment points for     setting the instrument properly level.
3221)    Looks like something designed to grip the end of a leather     strap. (the center bar would prevent it from being used to     scrape a strap along its length, which otherwise might be be an     option.
3222)    Another interesting device.
    My first guess (now rejected) was that it was for winding coils     with a known number of turns.
    Instead, it is something for applying a twist to something held     between the two points, while one point is rotated a number of     turns.
    The dial tells both how many turns, and how far the vertical     point has moved. The main beam is calibrated in 1/2" steps, and     it looks like the dial represents 0.001" per division (not sure,     with the 50-0-50 calibration, and difficult to get the gear     ratio without a view which lets me count the teeth on each gear.
    At a guess -- the screw in the bar is 20 TPI which would allow     the 0-50 part to represent one turn of the screw and the crank.
    Maybe it is for turning a really small drill bit, while feeding     the workpiece into it, but it is difficult to see both how     various sizes of drill bits could be held in the rotating part,     and how various workpieces could be held in the vertical part.
    Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Rob H. wrote:

3220 Folding Trivet.
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On 6/26/2014 3:43 AM, Rob H. wrote:

3222 used to twist wire. The slide on the bar controls where the twisting starts to occur, and the holder on the top does the twisting. The counter keeps track of the number of twists put in. Nice little unit.
pretty good the last few weeks...
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Machine tool lever sounds like a good guess, but no luck yet finding a reference for it.
Well, I have a few answers posted for this set, still waiting on the others:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2014/06/set-551.html#answers
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

I have a tool like that but with a metal handle. It is used to hold an inside bore gauge to reach deep into a bored hole.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/INTERNATIONAL-TOOL-CO-SAN-LEANDRO-CA-INSIDE-MICROMETER-BORE-SET-GAGES-15-/351097096053?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item51bf048775
John
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On 6/27/2014 5:11 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Rob, I don't believe that 3222 is a wire tester. There is no way that turning the wheel put's tension on the wire. It twists it. And the counter counts the number of turns.
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Jeff

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3221 -- Jar Opener?
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BORE-SET-GAGES-15-/351097096053?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item51bf048775

Thanks, I'm not sure if both tools are for the same purpose but I'll pass your idea along to the owner.
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    I think not. This one has a projecting point which tightens with the handle, and which goes into a dimple in the micrometer body (probably on the side away from us in the photo).
    The one in the puzzle is clamped from the sides, with a stronger grip (not needed nor desired for a bore micrometer), and the heavy wood handle suggests a significant amount of operating force needed.
    I still think that it is an operating lever for some machine tool.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    The vertical holder has a projection into a groove on the bar, where it engages a leadscrew on the same shaft as the handwheel. So, as you crank the handwheel, the vertical holder is moved either towards or away from the "headstock".
    But what I *really* wonder about is whether the horizontal holder rotates with the geared screw in the top, or whether it remains stationary. Knowing that could help determine what it really does. If it does not rotate, then a wire strain gauge is likely. If it does, then either a self feeding drill assembly is a possibility -- or it could be a tool for straightening wire (twisting wire under tension tends to straighten it).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 6/29/2014 12:34 AM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

There is nothing to indicate that the holder on the bar is screw driven. As a matter of fact quite the opposite. There is a knurled lock nu that indicates it's really stationary. So I don't believe it travels the rod... if it did why would it lock?
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Correct, the vertical part does indeed move back and forth when the handle is turned.

From what I remember it does not rotate but I just sent the owner an email asking about it, I'll post his answer here when he replies.
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I don't know the purpose of the knurled lock nut on the vertical part but I stood there and watched someone turn the handle and the vertical part moved along the rail. I still haven't heard back from the owner about whether the other part rotates, though I don't think it did.
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    There actually is -- both the groove on the upper back side of the bar leading in to the leadscrew which is inside the bar, and Rob H.'s posted observation elsewhere in this thread.

    Why not? Lock it while during setup and while zeroing the dial's pointer, so you start from a known place.
    Just as all of my lathes, whose carriage is intended to move along the ways, have a lock screw and wrench to use when facing instead of turning.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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