What is it? Set 517

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This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Larger images:
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Rob
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3013 some kind of screen or sieve. Small stuff falls through holes in rotating screen, big stuff get carried to end. Separates wheat (or rice) from chaff?
3015 peep sights
3016 some kind of optical instrument, hard to tell what it does. Might determine the degree of rotation of polarized light in a sample. Might be used to determine the curvature of a lens.
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3015 Sights for a weapon, probably a mortar.
3018 Artificial Horizon I note the marking for Dive/Climb. In view of the simple pedestal, perhaps for a trainer or as a classroom aid? Hard to imagine if it is for a plane or a submarine.
On 10/31/2013 4:10 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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On Thu, 31 Oct 2013 06:07:48 -0400, Alexander Thesoso

item 3016 looks like a variation of what Wikipedia calls an Abbe refractometer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbe_refractometer or a lensmeter: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lensmeter
There is a more common name for the device, but I can't think of it.
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Good answer, the tag on this device says Lensometer.
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On Thursday, October 31, 2013 7:21:39 AM UTC-5, Rob H. wrote:

ctometer > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbe_refractometer or a lensmete r: > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lensmeter There is a more common name for the device, but I can't think of it. Good answer, the tag on this devi ce says Lensometer.
Yes, a lensometer (model M603B?), made by the American Optical Company. Th ere are 2 pictured on this link: http://www.ebay.com/bhp/american-optical- company
Sonny
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You're right about them being sights but they aren't for mortars

Yes, this was described as being a "submarine diving gauge", but I don't anything more about it.
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Rob, sometimes responding to others' posts doesn't get to you, so.. 3013 is a seed cleaner. Lloyd
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Sponenburgh says...

Seed cleaner is correct. Probably the reason that sometimes I don't see some posts is because occasionally people post to just one of the groups instead of all three. I usually check all three but some weeks I don't have time and will just check one of them. When a I read a post in one newsgroup it's not marked as read in the other two so it's can be time consuming to look for posts that are just in one group.
Rob
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    Hmmm ... you need a better newsreader. The ones which I use (in unix systems where usenet news had its origin) mark all instances of a cross-posted article as read when you read in one newsgroup.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I'm currently using the Newsguy.com on line news reader, which I started using after getting errors in my previous reader, but I agree that I'll have to find a better one sometime soon.
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    Hmm ... perhaps a pointer in their newsgroup could get that modification made to their online newsreader. (I've never used it, though I've used Newsguy for quite a while -- with my newsreaders in my systems connecting to their news servers.
    Good Luck,         DoN.
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    I would not expect a submarine to dive or climb that steeply. I believe it is for aircraft -- and as I just mentioned, because of the mounting I suspect that it is a demo device, or a manufacturer's desktop give-away (to congressmen and the like).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 10/31/13 11:20 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Aw, you got me curious, Don! <http://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/more-furniture-collectibles/nautical-objects/submarine-diving-gauge/id-f_785612/
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    [ ... ]

    This shows that the seller *believes* it to be a submarine diving gauge, but I see significant problems with that.
1)    The ends of the axles appear to simply go through holes in the     gimbal, with just a thin washer between the ball and the gimbal     to minimize friction and wear on the painted surface of the     ball.
2)    Thus no gearing inside to allow reversing the direction of ball     tilt vs base tilt. (And something for use in a submarine would     not be set on a desktop platform base, which would slide at the     more extreme tilts.) (I would actually expect it to be mounted     in an instrument enclosure similar to that for aircraft     instruments.
3)    So -- a weight at the center of the bottom would cause the     indication to be "climb" (white top towards you) when it was     actually a "dive".
    Note that the aircraft instruments don't depend on weights to     cause the tilt. They are driven via servo motors and synchro     feedback and the direction of tilt is easily changed by the     wiring of the synchros used for position feedback. The signal     comes from the gyro stable platform used for all the navigation     instruments, which is located someplace safe in the body of the     aircraft.
4)    Note the radial lines coming from the intersection of the     horizon and the vertical climb-dive scale. This is used to     indicate the tilt from side to side. And there is no provision     in the mounting of this to allow it to rotate in that direction.
    Yes -- there *are* early artificial horizons which don't depend on a remote gyro -- I have a couple in my collection which have *built-in* gyros. One has the gyro spun by air sucked from the cockpit and exhausted through a venturi similar to that which also provides airspeed information. The other has a gyro spun by 115 VAC, three phase, 400 Hz. Both of those are prior to the use of a ball (easier to drive form the servos). Instead, there are mechanical linkages which move a horizon line up or down the same way that the horizon on the balls are designed to work. The horizon line goes up when in a dive -- just as the visible horizon goes up as seen through the windshield in a dive. (Assuming visibility is good enough to allow the horizon to be seen -- the major reason for artificial horizons being poor visibility. :-)
    And actually, the one in the puzzle and the web-based sale (I believe they are the same photo, actually) -- assuming that it is sitting on a horizontal desk -- if it were working on weights it should be indicating horizontal travel, instead of showing a dive. So this can be set by hand to indicate whatever you want, and it will stay there.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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3016 sure looks like a microscope. Or is there more to it than that?
3018 must be part of an aircraft turn-and-bank (attitude) indicator.
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3013: Sluice? 3014: Axe? 3015: 3016: 3017: 3018: 3019: artificial Horizon gauge for planes?
On 10/31/2013 4:10 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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Nope

Not exactly an axe but it's somewhat similar to one.
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Curd slicer Lloyd
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On 10/31/2013 4:10 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Posting from my desk top PC in yhe living room as always.
3013, Looks familiar, but can't place it. Might be a gasoline powered fish washer. 3014, some kind of garden hoe? 3015, the eye peep hole makes me wonder if it's some kind of gun sight. The military look makes me wonder if it's bomb robots like the use in Afghanistan. I've seen a couple episodes of Bomb Patrol Afghanistan. I have only respect for those deminers, I find that one terrifying job. 3016, some kind of microscope, or possibly refractometer? 3017, no clue. 3018, part of artificial horizon gage from airplane.
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