What is it? Set 513

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I need some help with numbers 2991 and 2992 in this week's set:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Larger images:
http://imgur.com/a/oJb2t
Rob
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On 10/3/13 4:14 AM, Rob H. wrote:

the domed lid, too
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Made me think of Claude Cooper for some strange reason...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjquGpmgwOo

--
William

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On 10/3/2013 8:12 PM, William Bagwell wrote:

Just the facts, man.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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Rob H.:

2989 - vat for brewing beer. 2994 - furnace fire grate.
--
Mark Brader "The past keeps getting cooler!
Toronto (And there's more of it every day!)"
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These are both correct.
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Looks like I didn't read that close enough, fireplace!
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On 10/4/2013 4:40 PM, Rob H. wrote:

"answers" in the subject line like always.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/3/2013 4:14 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2990, totally no clue. 2991, gage for measuring V belts? 2992, maybe some kind of crop harvester? 2993, some kind of punch, but no information beyond that. 2994, fireplace grate?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 3/10/2013 8:23 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yep 2991 is for measuring belt sizes.
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This seems to be the consensus answer but I haven't yet found one like it on the web.
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Rob H. wrote:

At only 5" long they would be some short belts. Maybe for sewing machines?
--
Steve W.

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The text on the tool appears to say Stoco, the only reference that I could find to this company is this lathe on ebay, looks like it might use small belts:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Standard-Optical-Co-Lens-Drill-Stoco-lathe- working-STEAM-PUNK-ELECTRIC-/281108237550
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On 10/3/13 5:20 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Stoco in Switzerland has been in business 50 years.
"Our mission: Offer you, thanks to our know-how recognized as well as our capacity for innovation solutions in the fields of Assembly of high precision. "
It looks as if the tool would measure o-rings 38-44mm in diameter.
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2989 is a common form of cauldron made by coppersmiths up until the 20th century. It could have been used for anything from dying cloth to rendering whale blubber.
I think 2991 is for measuring o-rings.
Paul K. Dickman
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2992: I've seen similar devices used for pulling stakes... like those anchoring circus tents and all that. But 2992 doesn't seem beefy enough for them.
Pretty sure it's used to pull something out of the ground....
Erik
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wrote:

I think it's used to form furrows in a garden . -- Snag
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I was thinking it might be a weeder but that's just a guess.
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Weeder for expansion joints in concrete would be my guess. My wife may have a better guess. Tool to *form* the expansion joint while the concrete is still wet.
--
William

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    O.K. Posting from the usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always. Where are the rest of you posting from -- there are three in the cross-posting list above.
2989)    Hmm ... I would be interested to see photos of the interior of     the cauldron.
    If it is bare copper, then I would suggest that was is for     handling large batches of laundry -- in pre washing-machine     days.
    Hmm ... also perhaps from an old whaling ship, used for     rendering the blubber into whale oil. A cast-iron one would     both weigh too much to be practical on shipboard, and be too     vulnerable from rusting from the salt spray.
    However, if it has been coated on the inside with tin, it could     be likely be for large scale food preparation. (Perhaps for     cooking two or three missionaries at a time? :-)
    The port in the dark area near the bottom is interesting, but     given the size, you can't just tip it over to empty it. :-) And     if it is for rendering whale oil, it would give an easy way to     decant it into barrels for storage -- with some form of valve to     turn on and off the flow.
    What is that warning to the bottom right of the image? A "Do     not clean"?
2990)    This is rather large for the purpose, but it is somewhat like     the mounting bracket for floor lamp shades.
2991)    A tool for measuring the inside diameter of a loop of some     flexible material, such as perhaps an automotive V-belt.
    Put the round "puck" inside the belt, squeeze the handle and the     plunger together, and read the belt size from the scale on the     shank.
    Hmm ... markings from 36 to 44 -- obviously not inches. With     about 5" of length, perhaps something close to 1" diameter for     the closed puck, or 25.4 mm -- so make it 25mm, and the scale     does not start until the marker on the shank has moved about the     equivalent of one unit or a bit less. So -- if that "36" is mm,     then fully closed it is something like 35mm diameter, which     would call for a diameter of about 11mm which is a lot too small     based on the rest of the image, so the units are not mm.
    Maybe make it tenths of an inch, so a fully closed 1" diameter     would be just a bit over 31 tenths, or 3.1" So -- lacking other     units to work with, let's call it tenths of an inch. And the     belts are perhaps a reasonable size for drive belts in cassette     tape recorders (but they are a bit too new for this), or perhaps     for measuring O-ring sizes.
    Maybe for measuring the size of bracelets in a jeweler's store.
2992)    Looks like a tool for cutting off plants close to the ground.
    Perhaps for harvesting heads of lettuce or something similar.
    A bit flimsy for many other tasks.
2993)    For puncturing curved metal straps, perhaps prior to attaching     via screws to more straps, or to allow setting it up to lock at     a particular sized loop -- perhaps for hanging pipes from     rafters.
2994)    Hmm ... could be for lying in state of a high-ranking     child who has died. An appropriate mattress would be     fitted inside, and ceremonial lamps at the near corners filled     with oil and lighted.
    Now to post and then see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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