What is it? Set 469

Page 2 of 2  
says...

2729 a bodhran tipper.
http://larkinam.com/Tippers.html http://www.whistleanddrum.com/bodhrans-bones-spoons/tippers http://www.huntertippers.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never would have guessed it was a drum stick but then I've never heard of a bodhran before. Thanks for the answer and for the links, I'll forward them to the owner of it.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
2725)    Strange beastie. Assuming that the bottom is sealed (which     I think is the case from the first photo), I would think that it     was intended to be sealed and put some kind of sample though a     tubular hole into a source of heat or cold for processing the     sample. The springs keep it from falling all the way in.
2726)    *This* one I know. It is intended to divide a space equally     for rivets for sheet metal (aluminum, titanium) attaching in     aircraft construction.
    You mark the position for the first and last rivet, and then     expand it so the end arms (all arms have a single hole at the     free end) are over the first and last holes, and mark the rest     through the holes in the other arms. If you need fewer rivets     than the full count (twenty in this example), you can use one     end and an inner arm over the end holes.
2727)    It sort of looks like a crimper for terminals, except that the     business end is not shown in sufficient detail. (The detail     which I want is hidden by the tape measure in the last photo).
    It could be for crimping joins of sheet metal instead. Or it     could be for straightening bent pins on integrated circuit     packages.
    I am puzzled by the lever, however. I would expect it to be for     closing the jaws more tightly -- but I think that as it sits, it     is for opening them instead. Perhaps it is for separating two     sides of an opening of some sort?
2728)    Sort of looks like a tool for manipulating a ham or a roast     beef during serving/slicing. The outer jaws close when the     handles are pressed together.
2729)    Intersting. It sort of looks like a beater for a bodhran     (pronounced bo-ran) an Irish frame drum), but it looks rather     ornate, and to have been made of ivory. Perhaps for a similar     drum in some African culture, instead?
    With a bodhran, it is beat alternately with both ends rather     rapidly by vibrating the beater back and forth in the hand. But     the beater is normally wood in all that I have seen.
2730)    Rack for securing twenty rifles with a single lock. Likely     for military use. Looks as though it closes on the barrel, with     the butt at the bottom. and the top has a separate locking     mechanism -- perhaps to grip by the sight or the bayonet mount.
    I see that the slots are numbered, so each soldier can recover     the weapon which was issued to him/her specifically.
    Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The previous owner of this one had some African artifacts so it could be from there, the current owner described it as quite heavy and said from its history it could be over 100 years old.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks again to everyone who helped solve some of the items this week, the answers for this set can be seen here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/11/set-469.html#answers
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2725 Ok, so it is a depth sounding gauge. Now, how does it work? Let me speculate that there is a check valve that lets the water in until it compresses the air in the body to equal the water pressure. The unseen scale can then be calibrated to give a rough indication of pressure-depth. I wonder about compensation for temperature and salinity. I also wonder about why this is more accurate than measuring the rope.
On 11/30/2012 5:17 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Alexander Thesoso wrote:

One answer is that the depth of the water is measured in fathoms and rope length is measured in feet. ; ) Actually, I'll still curious too.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I looked for a patent but didn't find one, so I don't have any information on how it works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

Maybe the boat doesn't have to stop for it to work (tougher with the rope)?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Makes sense considering the boat is most likely moving. The rope would be in a large arc as it is dragged through the water. So it's useless to measure the rope.. Even if the boat is stopped currents at the bottom would drag out the arc. I've seen this ice fishing with a gabbu for lake trout on Keweenaw Bay in Mich UP and sometimes the bottom current would require a heavier barracuda just to get to the bottom. ;>)}

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.