What is it? Set 464

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I need some help with the second item this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

2699 Bearing scraper.
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Correct, it's missing the wood handle. I had posted one of these a few years ago.
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2696. Some sort of calorimeter? For coal samples perhaps.
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I'm still not sure about this one but that sounds possible, someone found "a bunch" of these at their local scrap yard.
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2012 04:14:51 -0400, Rob H. wrote:

2700. In Aussie parlance, a "Binder". Tractor towed machine for making sheaves of hay. Mower fitting (forks and cutter blade/s) low and at front. Hay is cut by blades and swept onto canvas carrier by the rotating windmill (acts like harvester; not a header). Hay is combined into sheaves, tied (bound with string) and dropped out the back of machine.
2699. Given 2700 has a farming emphasis, could this be a bag needle for sewing wheat or more likely chaff, bags? (assuming flattened right hand end has slot cut in it for string)
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Yes, though I don't know if it's specifically for hay or if it is also for grain.

Nope, that's not it.
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2695 no clue 2696 ash collector for cigar smokers? Helps keep them from inhaling ash. Yeah, yeah, that's wrong. But, might seem funny to some. 2697 no clue 2698 early carpet stretcher. "Knee kicker". 2699, can't see very well. 2700, Orville and Wilbur Wright's first air plane. That, or some kind of farm harvester.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I need some help with the second item this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2697 - Since it is displayed on a glass pane, I'll guess it is some sort of tool used for cutting, marking or etching glass.... something associated with glass.... tool for applying bevel/profile of putty on framed glass.
Sonny
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Pulled by horse or tractor would cut and bundle grain. Some poor slob (me) would walk behind and gather 6 bundles, lean pairs together like an a-frame (a shock) (capping with a seventh bundle if rain is expected). A few days later, another poor slob (me, again) goes around and forks the dried bundles onto a wagon which carried them to the center of the field where the threshing machine had been set up.
Hot, dusty, dirty, hard work.
This binder currently has the transport wheelset. On the end of the cutting head, in the second picture, you can just see the wheel used when the binder is cutting grain.
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http://www.lurndal.org/images/thresh1-300.jpg
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http://www.lurndal.org/images/thresh2-300.jpg
scott
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On 10/25/2012 3:14 AM, Rob H. wrote:

bundles and carries the bundles until the operator dumps them. It was pulled by horses.
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Rob H. wrote:

--
G.W. Ross

I go to bed early; my favorite dream
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Correct, it is indeed a nutcracker.
No luck yet in figuring out the metal box but the rest of the answers have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/10/set-464.html#answers
Rob
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    O.K. I'm coming in late (and not sure how long I'll be able to read responses, with Sandy headed just a little North of us based on the latest predictions -- and they're talking about long power outages.
    And posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
    However, I now have a guess for # 2696
    Given the wire grid in the bottom, and the vent pipes on the sides, I find myself thinking of it as being for lost-wax casting. A master of the workpiece is made in wax. It is sometimes then coated with a refractory material which hardens and holds the surface texture, then perhaps packed in prepared sand for support -- or perhaps the wax is just packed in prepared sand if surface finish is not important, then it is baked to melt out the wax and harden the coating if present, and once that is done, the molten metal is poured in. Once it hardens, it is removed from the box and the sand (and possible coating) are broken off.
    The baking out of the wax is a possible explanation for the black stains on the top.
    It does not look like the usual two-part flask for straight sand casting, but it may work for lost-wax casting.
    Oh yes -- also some approaches make the master of styrofoam instead of wax, and burn that out.
    The pipes to the side both carry out the smoke, and possibly also can serve for lifting it while it is hot.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I don't know if it's the correct answer or not but it certainly sounds plausible, I'll send it on to the owner of the device along with some of the other suggestions. Good luck with the storm, hope it's not as bad as they say it could be.
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

a container for wax casting. The containers I use are simply stainless steel containers. A liner would slow down the burnout process needlessly.
--
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On 10/26/2012 3:22 PM, Rob H. wrote: ...

Hadn't seen this week's entries...
The old twine binders are a real memory walk--those guys had it pretty easy w/ oats! :) You ain't thrown a bundle until shocking feed (sudan or other sorghum) bundled green at 6-ft or taller! Then, during the winter to go and pick 'em up out of the shocks to bring to house to the stationary chopper when full of dirt and perhaps snow is a second treat...
Any chance of telling what the type of ash in the metal box is? I wonder if being in coal country it's possible they're a quick'n dirty method to burn a coal sample for ash content????
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says...

2697. Approximately 3"-5" long:
Native Fishing lures... Rotate image 180 degrees for best viewing.
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I don't think they are fishing lures, they were on display at an auction in a glass case with some American Indian and Inuit items.
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On 10/25/12 4:22 PM, Rob H. wrote:

It appears they were made to scrape cups about an inch deep and .75 - 1.5 inches in diameter, with center holes in the bottom.
<http://inuit.com/?p2=/modules/xgalleries/showgallery.jsp&curAlbIds&curPicsPage=2
I think perhaps traditional Inuit lamps used candles of animal fat, which is probably softer than our wax. These tools may have been to clean a lamp so a new candle would fit.
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