What is it? Set 414

Page 2 of 2  


I've searched for both umbrella holders and cane holders but had no luck for either, most umbrella stands have a some type of basin for catching water drops, and most holders for both items are usually lower to the floor. Maybe it is for canes but I sure couldn't find another one like it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/10/11 5:46 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Yes, I don't see why a cane holder would be portable. I wonder if it's for an activity where one would want to choose among a dozen tools with stick handles, all within arm's reach.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/10/2011 4:46 PM, Rob H. wrote: ...

My guess would be built for holding vases for decorative purposes or similar rather than storing things...just a guess.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, I'm diving in-
2395 - I'm going to say you entrap some material between the gears and pull it through to apply a crimp or ruffle.
2397 - for temporary lifting for leveling I'd say. Pianos? Doors?
2398 - 3 counter-weighted pivoting arms, but what happens when you press down on the big paddle? I think the fact the pivot for the paddle is covered in something soft(ish) means the arms would clunk against them. I'm going with some kind of a ganged balance.
2399 - Stand for bottomless champagne flutes
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/10/2011 4:21 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2395 looks like knurling wheels used in the (glass) mould making industry on CNC machines. Why a pair are set so closely together is anyone's guess. Maybe to hand knurl thin plate for a decorative edge?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think it is for "necking" metal ducting/stove-pipe sheets, prior to rolling.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/10/2011 6:43 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Yea, that sounds reasonable. I was thinking about something like a metal cookie plate that would be set out during holidays but I like your idea better.
Jihn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2395)    Looking at it, I believe it is to form a ripple on some     material (perhaps tin-plated steel) which is drawn between the     gears at their closest points. There is enough gap there for     thin materials to be pulled through.
    Perhaps for making strips to solder to a backing plate to make     decorative cookie cutters.
2396)    Hmm ... sort of looks like a tomahawk -- there are lots of     styles. Here is a decorative example (sorry about the long     URL).
    <http://www.crazycrow.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_CodeI34-413-014&Store_Code TP&search=Tomahawk&offset=&filter_cat=&PowerSearch_Begin_Only=&sort=&range_low=&range_high=>
    It would be interesting to know whether the hammerhead part is     drilled to use as a pipe, or is solid to be used as a hammer.     If drilled to use as a pipe, the handle would probably also be     drilled to carry the smoke to the user's mouth.
2397)    A lever for lifting or moving something, with a built-in     fulcrum.
2398)    It looks like a relative to a three-hole paper punch, with     fixtures to aid in aligning the paper -- except that I can't get     enough detail from the images to be sure what the punch and dies     look like, if they are even there.
2399)    Perhaps for a church to hold a number of candles for the     participants to carry in after someone else lights them in the     stand?
2400)    A pair of hemispheres to demonstrate the amazing force that     air pressure can produce, by evacuating the mated set of     hemispheres. It looks as though a second handle screws onto the     side with the valve after it is pumped down.
    An early demonstration had a somewhat larger set which could not     be pulled apart by two teams of horses pulling on the two     hemispheres.
    These are nice ones, made of bronze. The ones which I have seen     in the school physics lab were cast iron instead, but served the     same purpose quite well. Looks like these would handle perhaps     184 lbs of force before separating.
    Now to post this and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2396. A lather's hatchet.
2397. From your hint - lift railroad car furniture out of socket receivers and tweak them into position when they're put back. Probably used when the floor was refinished/cleaned.
2398. Something to do with bookbinding.
2399. A drink holder in a billiard room.
2400. Sprays insecticide or other liquid/powder.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tough set this week, still not sure about the three unidentified items, the rest of the answers have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/11/set-414.html#answers
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/11/11 5:26 PM, Rob H. wrote:

2399: How about a multicolor knitting stand?
For knitting with one color, one would presumably pull the yarn from a ball in the bowl of one of these stands, rather than keep the ball in one's lap.
http://www.art-conservation.org/templates/conservation_images/stand.jpg
http://www.nikisawyer.com/sheep/images/victorian_knitting_stand.jpg
The mystery stand could be a great advantage for someone knitting a garment with up to a dozen colors. I think it used yarn cones similar to these.
http://www.camillavalleyfarm.com/pics/fibre/cones2.jpg
You wind your yarn on the part of the cone that's bigger than the diameter of the holes in the mystery stand. You invert a wound cone and stick it in a hole, then bring the free end of the yarn over the top (big end) and down through the little end. Yarns from the cones in the top plate would extend through the little holes in the bottom plate so they could be tugged without hitting the cones in the bottom plate.
When you want to knit, you get your stand from the corner and put it by your knitting chair. You have up to twelve yarns hanging below the bottom plate. You pull the one you want first. No tangling, and you can easily spot the color you want.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/11/11 8:21 PM, J Burns wrote:

I checked with a relative who has a knitting machine. She says a stand with a dozen cones could be useful in a cottage industry knitting Fair Isle sweaters. They became fashionable after the Prince of Wales began wearing them in 1921. You knit with two colors at a time but change frequently, choosing from a palette.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I guess it's possible but I did a search on 'cone yarn holder' and they all had spindles to hold it, didn't see a single one that held the cone in a hole. If you can find any holders that work on this theory, let us know.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2401: Explosion-proof socket wrench. You have to use explosion-proof sockets, which by design are reversed from ordinary sockets to prevent mixing them up. (no? Sounds plausible, doesn't it, though :-) )
2402: Some sort of gambling table.
2403: An oddly shaped hammer
2404: Cheese cutter for Limburger and other cheeses you don't want to get near.
2405: Novelty water pipe
2406: A rejected design for a tool to tap thicknet ethernet, back in the dayes of olde.
--
The problem with socialism is there's always
someone with less ability and more need.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.