What is it? Set 379

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Now I know how to use mine! I didn't know about the stop watch! Makes sense now !! Jerry
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On 3/10/2011 4:58 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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Ralph wrote:

It appears to be some kind of gas burner, but may not be for a cook stove. It looks like the air intake manifold is designed to hook up to piping to bring in combustion air from some distance. The pictures are pretty lousy so its is hard to tell.
-jim
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2185 Car Drop light plug into cigarette lighter
2186 Hay bailer
2187 Pasta spoon
2188 Clamp
2189 welded Art
2190 Sword medallion
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This one came in a leather pouch and could be described as a tool, the hole has a sharp edge on the inside.
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2185)    Looks like an old automobile trouble light,     designed to plug into a cigarette lighter outlet.
    The hook keeps it from sliding away from where it is being used.
    What is not clear is why the mechanical shutter instead of a     switch in the cord.
    Of course -- it could be a timing light, missing perhaps the     part to fire the bulb -- but the bulb sort of looks like an     incandescent -- though it might not be the original lamp.
2186)    If the diagonal part between 3 and 15 on the drawing is     a spring or a rubber band, then it is some kind of shock mount,     perhaps for something like transporting nitroglycerine or some     similarly sensitive product.
    If there were a pointer of some sort, I would consider it to be     possibly a form of scale instead.
2187)    Looks like a tool for manipulating the grate in a woodstove, or     something similar.
2188)    Well ... the central object is a Starrett mechanical tachometer     which you have put up before. But I presume you are asking     about the wood object just above it instead.
    That looks like something for supporting a workpiece between     centers -- but since there is not a thread on the shaft of the     T-handled part, nor a visible thumbscrew for locking it down,     instead I will suggest that it is for pushing a cork into a     style of bottle with a depressed center.
    The fact that it is displayed with the tach and some small     C-clamps in interesting, and calls into question what kind of     museum display it happens to be.
2189)    Way too blurred to really make a guess at all. Sorry.
2190)    Slips on over a small pipe. Might serve to keep rain     out of an exhaust pipe until opened. Perhaps if I looked up     Crestmark, I would learn more -- or perhaps not.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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The two wood tools were part of a private collector's display in his museum, the walls were full of tools that were mostly grouped according to use but a lot of adjacent items were not related so the C-clamps and tach are not good clues for these tools.
Rob
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On 3/10/11 5:58 AM, Rob H. wrote:

bore of his Kentucky Long Rifle scrupulously clean with a wet patch. He used the cap from his lipstick case to measure his powder.
Most riflemen used hard lead balls so they wouldn't deform too badly to jam down the bore. Crestmark's case protected his soft lead balls. He'd choose one and push it through the center hole to trim it to the precise size of his bore.
The end of his ramrod was a hollow cone. As he tapped the ramrod to pack the ball against the powder, the ball would deform, becoming pointed with its sides mashed into the grooves of the rifling.
Harper's Ferry began producing 54-caliber yaggers in 1803. Crestmark found himself tossed onto the Ash Heap of History.
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2186- Who would pay money to dry corn that way ??A beam & four nails would be cheaper !!!Goes to show !!!Sucker born every bay !!! I thought farmers were smarter then that!! Jerry
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We used these as a trouble/working light in aircraft. It plugged in such as a bulb would in a socket. Note the small pins used to align the plug as needed in a socket. The pins are also used to retain the plug, again as in retaining a bulb in a socket. The shutter is used to restrict the light path as desired.
Bob AZ
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