What is it? Set 372

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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2143)    Tool for deburing the other side of a drilled or punched hole.     Drilled is more likely to have limited access to the far side.
2144)    If the Pyrex logo is a round green color fired onto the glass,     then it is some form of chem lab equipment. There is a lot     which has been special modified for an unusual task.
    This may have started as a sphere with a single neck, and the     other two were added by a glassblower at the lab in question.     Given the angles of the necks, I suspect that it was for     reacting at least two gasses, and drawing off the results in yet     another direction.
    If it is such a modified piece of labware, it is unlikely to     have a specific name.
    It does look to have plain necks, not the ground glass fitted     ones for coupling directly to other glassware -- so whatever it     reacted probably would not attack rubber stoppers.
2145)    Lots of possibilities -- most of which would be supported by the     presence of markings on the box somewhere.
    It looks as though the two binding posts are not on the     standard 3/4" center to center spacing, so I suspect that it was     someone's home-made product. (The reason for the standard     spacing is so standard dual banana plugs can fit into it, not     needing a separate connection to each post. The posts will     accept banana plugs, wires (through a transverse hole under the     knobs) and fork terminals.
    The fact that two different colors of binding post are used     suggests that it is polarized - but it may also simply represent     what was available from the piece of equipment which was     canibalized to supply the binding posts. These are the cheap     ones which were used on Heathkit equipment, and likely from     Radio Shack stores as well.
    I don't see the normal insulating mounting spacers, so the box     itself is likely plastic, not metal -- unless it is a dummy     device not really intended to be connected to.
    What is there could be:
    1)    A standard cell (1.0194V or so) -- but there should be         a marker to not turn it upside down. (Standard cells         really have to sit on a shelf forever undisturbed.)
    2)    A standard resistor (no need for polarity there), but         there should be a marking showing the value.
    3)    A standard capacitor. If electrolytic, the polarity         markings from the colors of the binding posts is useful,         of course. Again -- no markings to show the value         inside.
    4)    A battery (polarity makes sense there, of course), but         again, no markings. And -- no obvious way to replace it,         though the bottom could be open. We don't see that         view, so we don't know.
    5)    Intended to look like an explosive device.
    6)    Something which I have not yet thought of.
2146)    Some kind of trap or remote-release cage. I note that the     floorboard appears to be under stress, which might be used to     shoot the door open or closed.
2147)    Looks like something designed for rolling a groove between a     curbstone and the grass alongside it -- or alongside a sidewalk     or driveway.
2148)    Looks like something designed to measure some characteristic     of a gas -- and to adjust the flow of it. It looks as though the     meter dial is marked in percent, and it appears to be an     electrical meter of some sort.
    There is a hose barb on the right. The left might be an     adjustment knob or some form of calibrating plugin.
    There is an old mil-standard connector on the other end of the     cable.
    I don't know whether the hanging loop pivot does anything else     as well -- since it appears to be knurled for either adjustment     or field removal and replacement.
    Now to send this off and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I'll ask the owner what color the logo is and will post the reply when I get it.
Rob
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2145: It may be a mystery component, for use in a school lab, where one test of budding young electrical engineers is to have them figure out what's in the box by making electrical tests only.
Despite the color scheme, this is called a "black-box test".
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

Well Joe, the famous "Black Box" which was invented by an Australian and is in every aeroplane, is orange.
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I wasn't aware that Wilhelm Cauer was an ozzie.
scott
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wrote:

I realize that some citizens of the US, have misinterpreted the name Australia and confused it with Austria, which are approximately 9000 miles apart But, although Austria is close to Germany, let us not confuse the subject further Wilhelm was a German and had nothing to do with flight recorders at all.
Wilhelm Cauer (June 24, 1900 - April 22, 1945) was a German mathematician and scientist. He is most noted for his work on the analysis and synthesis of electrical filters and his work marked the beginning of the field of network synthesis.
Don't know where you got your information from, but, this may clear things up for you:
Dr David Warren of the Aeronautical Research Laboratories in Melbourne, Australia invented the "Black Box" flight data recorder. He was the first person to conceive of the idea of recording the flight crew's conversation on an airplane and of protecting that recording in the event of a crash or fire. The purpose of the Black Box was to help identify the reasons for a plane crash, by recording any clues in the flight crew's conversation. The Black Box was invented in 1953 and in production by 1957. The first ones were painted bright red or orange to make them easier to find after a crash. In 1960, Australia became the first country to make flight recorders mandatory in aircraft.
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I have no confusion on any of these topics. Geo Frost indicated that the term black box was related to flight recorders.
I point out that Wilhelm Cauer was the originator of network synthesis for the transfer functions of black boxes in the 1940's.
scott
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wrote:

Correct
Wrong again, You didn't do too well in history, did you ?

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Hell, BF Skinner's "Black Box" isn't even a box.
--riverman
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On 1/22/11 3:24 AM, George W Frost wrote:

I believe the first time the world saw a famous black box was December 26, 1908. It was in Sydney, but Burns was Canadian and Johnson was American.
In response to Jack London's appeal, Jeffries offered to prove that the white man was king of them all in 1910. Friends dragged him from the ring before the referee could count a knockout. Whites rioted in 50 cities across the US. In a joint project, film companies made a $250,000 documentary. Congress banned transporting the film across state lines. Teddy Roosevelt, until that point an avid boxing fan, said the sport should be banned.
Johnson was sentenced to federal prison because he'd once had a white girlfriend. He went on a world tour instead. Then he invented a new wrench. He returned to the US and took up residency in Leavenworth so he could get in patented: 1,413,121. I don't know why Rob hasn't displayed it!
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J Burns wrote:

You seem to have confused "famous 'black box'" with "'famous Black' box."
One's a noun, the other's a verb.
Have a Nice Day! Rich Grise, Self-Appointed Chief USENET Grammar and Syntax Police
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