What is it? Set 370

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2131, is a hand operated chaff cutter
2132: two different saws, one has an angle marker, the other has not, made by Spears and Jackson
2133: it is a steamer pot, put water in the main pot and the other parts are for different sized pots to sit on for steaming,
2134: is a wax seal , the ring fits on the finger, the container holds the wax and the end bit is the hallmark.
2135: is a pipe sludge remover
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2131: sawbuck variant, probably (because the log will be close to the ground) for an axe-wielder who is busily trimming off branches. Maybe, could support light hewing (but only of the topmost surface, that close to the soil)
2133: fill the bottom with hot water, it keeps a bowl or pot in the center hot (or with ice water, cold). If you put a fire under it, it becomes a steam bath like old chem lab apparatus (usually seen with a round flask on the hole).
2136: cores for a hydraulic control valve?
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2131)    Looks like something for holding a rough hewn plank for     planing or perhaps shaping by an adze.
2132)    Looks like it provides a more comfortable grip for someone     with a large hand.
2133)    The bottom half of a double boilerl with a set of adaptor rings     to accommodate various sizes of upper pans -- the smallest for     melting butter at a guess.
2134)    Perhaps for waxing thread while sewing either in general, or     to make it easier to start the thread through the eye of a     needle.
2135)    For gripping and pulling up a cylindrical vertical pipe,     perhaps a well pipe which needs to be replaced.
2136)    Hmm ... strange things. They look like part of a set of     controls which select gears by rotating and sliding to proper     positions -- perhaps for selecting threading gears in a gearhead     lathe.
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 01/06/2011 05:46 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Last week someone (on r.c.m.?)was looking for a way to pull rotted fenceposts from inside their concrete collar.
Number 2135 looks like it would do nicely.
technomaNge
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    It was rec.crafts.metalworking -- but they were looking for ways to pull the plugs of concrete (footers) from below rotted and removed fenceposts.

    Rotted posts, yes. The concrete footer plugs, no.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 01/06/2011 05:46 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2136 are the interior slugs from hydraulic control valves. Different positions route the fluid to different ports of the housing these fit into.
technomaNge
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I suggest 2134 might be holder for the oil used in baptisms in the Episcopal and Roman church. Ring is so you don't accidentally drop it.
See:
http://www.catholicchurchsupply.com/church-supplies/Sacramental-and-Communion-Supplies/category/1770/sort/popular
For anointing, as well...
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On Thu, 06 Jan 2011 06:46:59 -0500 in snipped-for-privacy@news4.newsguy.com, Rob H. wrote:

Along the lines that have already been suggested, is the distance between the two screws identical in 2132? Is the handle reversible?
S
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I don't own the saw so I can't measure the distance but I don't think it's reversible, and that wasn't the intended answer.
Rob
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wrote:

no "stop" to make sure of the alignment and the alignment has to be done by "eye".
I think that one of the poster who said the saw was for cutting when the material being cut isn't at the usual sawhorse height.

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Look at the photo again, then look again and you should see that thet handle angle is placed against the wood to be cut, at whichever angle you want, then you mark a line by using the saw blade along the wood

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    The *handle* itself is the stop -- and the back edge of the blade is the edge along which the lines are drawn. The back edge is at right angles to one surface of the handle, and at 45 degrees to the other. You rest one of those two surfaces of the handle against the edge of the board, and draw your line using the back of the blade.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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