What is it? Set 338

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--riverman wrote:

I seem to recall seeing wood bands used to clamp cloth. How about a beach wedding for an Irish witch? Wouldn't this item be just the thing to fasten a veil to her pointy hat?
Suppose Inis Mor had a parking meter as a tourist attraction. They certainly wouldn't want it exposed to salt spray in the off season. So they put a tarp over it and fasten it with this device.
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There was a second picture of it that I didn't post, it's the top one at the link below, the bottom image is the original one that I posted already:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album11/DSCF3725.jpg
The longer piece was described as 'maybe 8 inches', if this is an accurate estimate then the part that some have called a handle is about 2-1/2" long.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

enough for a pan to support at three points. It would strain tea for several people at once. Some say metal strainers spoil the flavor of tea. The frame of a tea sock could well be left on a beach, especially if the group left after dark.
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If it were a tea or coffee sock, I'd expect to see some significant staining.
--riverman
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--riverman wrote:

I'll back off about coffee. I recall a 1948 study comparing the diet of Irish immigrants in Boston to that of their cousins in Ireland. In Ireland they drank little coffee but lots of tea.
I recall teabag stains on plastic cutting boards but not wood. Tea staining works with some teas on some kinds of wood. The mystery item is already about the color of a tea stain, and it appears to have a finish. If somebody took the trouble to use curved wood, wouldn't he rub in a little linseed oil so it wouldn't absorb water?
If I owned the mystery item, I'd sew a cloth bag with three loops. That would give me a more practical strainer than using a rubber band to fasten a cloth across the top of a pot.
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"Carl G."wrote

Because I reckon you'd you probably *know*, I decline to suggest what I thought it might have been (that is the inside of a pianola roll).
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1939)    Not a "bug" (a Morse Code key which mechanically times     the spacing and duration of the dots), but one designed to send     commands to an electronic package which generates the timing of     the dots, spaces, and (I believe) the dashes as well, leaving     only the inter-letter and inter-word spaces to the user.
    O.K. A quick search in Google tells me that this is called an     "Iambic keyer" -- distinguished by the dual paddles.
    Hmm ... it looks as though the one used to illustrate the type     in Wikipedia is the very one you have in your question.
    See: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telegraph_key>
1940)    Hmm ... for all I know -- this could be simply an exercise in     wood carving -- or a simple puzzle. To disassemble it, you     rotate the part opposite the "spur" 90 degrees and work the two     tabs out through the slots. Once that is done, the remaining     shorter piece can be similarly removed from the longer one.
    It might be an example of folk jewelry.
1941)    Intersting -- combination chair and step ladder. The back     pivots forward with two-thirds of the seat, putting the extra     steps above the first two. And the number matches my birth     year -- FWIW. :-)
1942)    Looks like part of a high frequency antenna.
    At a guess two bands. I'm too lazy to calculate the probable     frequencies. :-)
1943)    Part of the harness for allowing a horse (or perhaps an ox) to     draw a heavy load.
1944)    A message tube for military or diplomatic messages? It looks     as though the end caps remove -- either a friction fit, or     a threaded fit.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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