What is it? Set 324

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Dust Bunny Queen wrote:

Well, a prop shaft for a "large" boat would be many multiples of diameter than these...

I'd still want to see the other ends in closeup. They had to attach to or be supported by something and w/o that clue think it's an impossible quest.
The equipment dealer doesn't surprise me at all--perhaps they're hydraulic piston shafts if they're really not steel altho most of them recently (like last 50 years were chromed). Again, there would have to be other stuff on other end for seals, etc., ..., that isn't shown.
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Here is a shot of the other end of one of the rods, not really any details to see on it:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album11/pic1857rd.jpg
Still not sure about the two unidentified items but the rest of them have been answered correctly:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/02/set-324.html#answers
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

OK, so assuming there's not another end whacked off previously these had to be mounted in a clamping arrangement which presumes there were likely fixed and whatever rotated was turned by gear or belt drive. Perhaps all they were was an tensioner idler shaft in a power drive? If indeed are bronze perhaps was a nautical application; that gets beyond my realm quickly.
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    O.K. Some hints of it being cut off by a power hacksaw or stock cutting bandsaw. This may mean that these are intended to be used as replacements for the part of worn propeller shafts which protrudes through the stuffing box.
    I suspect that this is intended to be welded onto the rest of the propeller shaft in the boat as easier than replacing the whole length of the propeller shaft -- and perhaps having to duplicate whatever coupling to the engine was actually in use.
    Perhaps, it gets an appropriate flange coupling, perhaps a universal joint, welded in place when it gets put into service. It is left blank for the moment because while the taper for the propeller mount may match a standard for that size, there may be multiple standards for the coupling to the motor (and clutch or gearbox which may or may not be also present).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote: ...

That's actually a pretty good thought/suspect...would resolve the problem.
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dpb wrote:

You are all on the wrong track for the inboard end coupling. Two years ago I fitted a new shaft to our boat that apart from the exact dimensions and material could have passed for one of those. Mine was 3/4" dia stainless to handle 9HP. Bronze shafts for the same power would be 1" dia upwards. This is the type of coupling I used.
<http://www.randdmarine.com/SSHCOUPLINGS/sshcouplingspop.asp
It replaced one that was indistinguishable apart from the excessive rust.
More info here: <http://www.randdmarine.com/downloads/RandD_Steel.pdf
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    O.K. So we finally have someone who *knows* how it is done, instead of just speculating as I have been doing based on the knowledge that bronze is good for marine use, and the tapered end to fit the propeller.
    However, based on the sawn off threaded part, I suspect that the fellow who had them had them for stock for making projects instead of as actual replacement propeller shafts.
    Thanks for the information,         DoN.
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DoN. Nichols wrote: ...

And my near-nothing knowledge of marine applications but knowing there had to be something other than just the shown shaft ends... :)
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dpb wrote:

no key for relatively low power applications: small to medium yachts and displacement motor boats usually with one or two cylinder diesels. ALL the larger couplings from R&D marine either are clamp on with a keyway or are supplied pilot bored and will have a taper + keyway machined to fit a shaft prepared similar to the propeller end (best if identical as then the shaft can be swapped end for end when it gets worn).
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IanM wrote: ...

Yes, I would have presumed that as well...my essentially my only experience w/ props is watching the machining of experimental very low turbulence noise versions for Navy sub's in the Y-12 facility in Oak Ridge a number of years ago. At something approaching an individual's height per blade, they were sized for quite significantly larger shafts than these... :)
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Thanks to everyone for the help on these, I changed my answer to say that they are propeller shafts for boats.
Rob
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    Probably reasonable for bronze which has been exposed to salt water for some time. The "bluish" part is a salt of the copper component of the bronze. I've actually got some Naval Bronze of that color, bought from eBay and I use it a few inches at a time for projects as the need occurs.

    Well ... that would probably be a reasonable size for about a 35' power boat. Remember -- it has to exit the hull below water through a "stuffing box" to prevent flow of water into the hull. And the motor is better a bit closer to the center of the boat to keep the balance better, so long propeller shafts make sense. Actually longer than that, and I suspect that whatever coupling was on the other end has been sawn off -- perhaps to replace the propeller end with ones which have less wear where they go through the suffing box.

    And how clean a cut at the non-machined end? Does it look turned, or hacksawn?

    Did he have a lathe? Material like that is nice to have for turning projects. A very high quality bronze at typically low prices because it is no longer suitable for the propeller shaft application thanks to wear where it exited through the suffing box.

    :-)
    O.K. Thanks.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1859 looks similar to an adjusting lever that was used on the farm when I was a kid. The old Oliver drill my Dad had for planting wheat, milo and other row crops had a lever similar to 1859 under each drop tube under the seed box on the drill The lever could be adjusted for various sizes of seeds. For instance the same drill could be used to plant different seeds like wheat, rye, barley etc. Other possibilities come to mind but I associate them all with various types of farm equipment I worked with.
DL
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