What is it? Set 318

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What? You never made barrels? <g> People who make old-style wooden chairs use them for carving the hollows in the seats. And little ones are used for some kinds of carving, especially for bowls and spoons. I have a couple from my family's panel-carving business, and they're around 130 years old.
I'm sure you're right that 1823 isn't a woodworking scorp. Maybe it's used for something else. And maybe they don't call it a scorp in that business, whatever it may be.
--
Ed Huntress




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wrote:

Googling scorp + tool works. If you like the funky tool words, woodworking has bruzz and spud and arris is always useful.
R
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    O.K. Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
1819)    Hmm ... something which rotates from the hot air from below it     (which means that the bearings are a lot better than I would     otherwise expect from the period). Perhaps used to rotate a     chunk of meat, or a pot of something like beans, to even out the     heating which would otherwise be from one side only.
1820)    A tool for hooking and levering up a manhole cover perhaps,     or a lid from a wood stove -- but it does not look old enough     for that.
1821)    This is a tool for compressing the OD of a watch crystal or     the like for snapping it into the bezel.
    I would actually like to own one of these if the owner is     willing to part with it.
1822)    Never seen anything which looks like this before.
    However -- for guesses -- it appears to be intended to control     a gas flame -- in part by the lever on the left in the first     photo, and in part by a belt drive via the pulley on the bottom     in both main photos.
    The lever controls how much gas pressure reaches the rest of it,     and I think the pulley also controls the gas pressure as well.     I *think* that the brass projection (top right in first photo)     may be a jet which is rotated by the pulley, while the     right-projecting fitting feeds gas on to some other burner.
    While the close-ups are a help, it would be really nice to have     it in my hands to play with to increase my chances at a     reasonable guess.
1823)    Looks like something for cleaning out gutters at the eves of     a house.
1824)    Strap for mounting some piece of military gear (based on the     color of the fabric more than anything else. No more guess     than that.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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The tool on my site isn't for sale but you can find a new one on ebay for $22, which is cheaper than I paid for mine.
Rob
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    Thanks! I hadn't done any searches on eBay for that -- figuring:
A)    It would only be available from watch repair suppliers.
B)    That it would be a lot more expensive than has been shown.
    Thanks again,         DoN.
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wrote:

My ideas, mostly wild imaginations:
1819 - Candle forming machine of some sort -- perhaps to shape dipped candles uniformly as they cooled.
1820 - A handle that can be attached to several different implement heads, perhaps different forms of small shovels.
1821 - Puller head for something, like small pulleys or brass instrument mouthpieces that have become stuck in their instruments
1822 - Nothing solid, but I rather fancy that this could be a governor for a (presumably stationary) engine of some sort.
1823 - Hook knife, for carving concave items -- this one appearing to me to be especially suited to hollowing out gutters for a roof.
1824 - Joiner piece to hold two bits of cloth or belting together (fitting over buttons fastened to the two items). Similar but smaller fasteners are used in some garments at times, I believe.
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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1823. Is this used to by farriers to work on a horse's hoof?
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Nope, it's not for use on horses.
Rob
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"Rob H." <> wrote in message

Perhaps 1823 is a masonry tool. Could be used to form the top of a wall for instance. phil kangas
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1820 might be a weed puller
1821: No doubts about this one, it's a watch crystal tool, I have one!
Steve R. One time watchmaker.
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Maybe 1819 is a *heater* (that one or more folks might sit on?). Looks like it would do a good job of dissipating some heat from some embers. Evidently my earlier guess of wooden wheel shaper was wrong...
Bill
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On Thu, 7 Jan 2010 05:30:31 -0500, Rob H. wrote:

Some weird and wiled ones this week
1820 has the look of a Thistle Grubber A tool for getting out thistles and other noxious weeds by pushing into the ground (like a spade or shovel the 2 prongs near the root of the weed pushing down and lifting it out of the ground. Robin from kiwi land
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