What is it? Set 271

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Just one unidentified item this week, I have no idea what that thing is:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Sorry for the double post, I blame it on not being fully awake yet. ;-)
Rob
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You have recently visited an aerodynamic museum.
1539 Wind tunnel test model. Some sort of fin stabilized hypersonic projectile. The support strut is on the left.
1541 Airplane engine starter.
1542 Wind Tunnel. It must have been an interesting and highly skilled job to fabricate this structure.

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Alexander Thesoso wrote:

Looks to me more like the pitch/yaw sensor on an air data boom.

That might be the original Wright wind tunnel. No, it was one of their later tunnels, made in 1911. On display at the Air Force Museum.

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You're good, Rob, but 1539 is a harpoon for shooting turkeys in flight DAMHIK .
Flash
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this week only one silly guess...
1540 ... hmmm, looks like a probe stand for hot things (Probestnder)
greetings from germany Chris
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1540. The only one I know. I had one as a kid, it was a frame for making Indian bead work.
As usual, the rest make me feel pretty dumb.
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Thanks! I never would have guessed that, I'll pass this on to the owner.
Rob
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This is one of several shapes. Another common shape was a round one. As was pointed out by my scoutmaster, the native americans did not have these mass produced looms for their beadwork. So they were not exactly authentic in that regard. These are a kit-crafty type of thing. They made it easy for kids to make something with beads.
These are still quite common and used to make bead projects. Just google "bead looms" or :beading looms" for a huge selection and more information.
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Google "indian bead loom" - many examples.
ed
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Yup. Had one too. Cub Scout era----late 50's early 60's. Probably ratted away somewhere at my folks place, my mother throws away NOTHING.
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yup I remember using one of them in summer camp. I knew when I first looked at it that I had seen it before, the second picture with the pin on the center of the roller and the wing nut to hold the belt tight brought back memories.
John
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1537: This is a mechanical safety overide for a rocket engine, it fits between the accelerometer and a valve limiting the fuel when the 10 G mark is passed, or alternatively it is a ping pong ball tester.
basilisk
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Interesting guess, but not correct. It's an astronaut's version of a common household tool, although there is one additional feature included.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

rockets/astronauts.
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

Knew it would be on the Air Force Museum site somewhere.
http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/050328-F-1234P-017.jpg
Look on the lower left. The item on the lower right might also be interesting--yet another spin-off.
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wrote:

My guesses:
1537 - My first thought was some sort of RF connector, but then I saw the size of this rather mysterious contraption and gave up on that idea. The left side would appear to possibly allow the mounting of a motor or engine or gearbox, so maybe this is a winch mechanism of some manner.
1538 - Assuming the opening is at the narrow tip of the box part, this may be a fruit picker, possibly for cherries. If the opening is the opposite trapezoid, it could also be a box for taking the offering in a church.
1539 - This looks vaguely like some ill-conceived arrowhead for hunting, but it's much too large. The squared-off fins on the cone part where the four arms attach aren't particularly aerodynamically shaped, so (given the otherwise sophisticated finishing and machining) I doubt it was intended to be part of a flying object. I'll go way out on a limb and guess it's a top for a lightning rod.
1540 - Perhaps a cradle to support/display something, such as the neck of a string instrument. If so, there would seem to be a missing strap to go betwixt the dowels.
1541 - I'm guessing you're looking for something more precise than "truck." Maybe this vehicle is intended to start airplane motors, by engaging some mating connector on or near the motor. The fire extinguishers on the back would fit well with this theory.
1542 - This appears to be either an air tunnel for testing airfoils and such, or some sort of signaling horn or siren. The rather heavy shaft and flat belt drive pulley would preclude rapid starting and stopping, so I think the air tunnel is more likely than the horn.
Now to read other people's ideas.
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Andrew Erickson

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(I can't resist) I never even knew that astronauts are held together with screws!
-- Ed Huntress
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Gee, you never know what will tickle a funny bone. d8-)
-- Ed Huntress
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70% rubbing alcohol) then blow dry with compressed air. Be sure to turn the computer off first DAMHIKT! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Gerald Miller wrote:

I clean a lot of used keyboards. I stand them up on the end and spray a fine mist of household ammonia to cut the grime. Sometimes it takes several tries, because they are really nasty. Then I use a mist of water to flush the loose crud from the keys & case. I usually do them 10 at a time, then let them dry for a week, but they can be used almost immediately. That depends on how much you spray on one.
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And another motherboard bites the dust!

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