What is it? Set 246

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Just posted this week's set:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1388 - Jib for motion picture or TV Camera.
1389 - Gang saw to cut fret slots on guitar fingerboard.
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1387. mold to make lead hammer put handle in hole, melt lead in ladle and pour. Last couple weeks are relly hard. Karl
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wrote:

Finally getting back to this after being away and/or busy for a few weeks....
1387 -- Very strange cast object. Possibly used in a metal casting operation? Molten lead or whatever could be scooped (or melted) in the ladle portion, and scum and slag captured in the hollow cylindrical hinged portion by tilting the works slightly, then the purer metal poured into the mold.
1388 -- Googling "Brains and Pictures" reveals that it's an austrian firm specializing in camera handling machinery for television and motion picture use. It would therefore seem that this is some sort of a motorized camera positioning system.
1389 -- Clearly a multiple saw of some manner, seemingly used to saw grooves in or possibly strips of a sheet good of some sort. From the substantial size of the arbor, I'm guessing maybe its used for metal (Aluminum?). The sizes of the strips or groove spacing obviously vary; it's not clear, to say the least, what possible construction they may be used in.
1390 -- Spring compressor, maybe for valve springs on old engines?
1391 -- Early form of GPS navigator device, giving directions to the operator of a motor vehicle. Maybe used by drivers on a bus line. "Macadam and pike" would refer to paved roads or toll (turnpike) roads, presumably the smoothest, fastest, and best-maintained of the day.
1392 -- Clueless, but with a nagging suspicion I should recognize this. The cutout appears to be a bottle cap lifter shape, while the toothed bit looks like it should engage a bit of belting, two functions that generally don't go together.
--
Andrew Erickson

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Rob H. wrote:

1387. For casting a lead or Babbit hammer head on a metal handle. 1388. Aerial Camera Dolly 1389. Gang Saw for slitting sheet materials into strips 1390. Specialised C-clamp Brake or spring compressor? 1391. Trip directions on roads from Cinci to Dayton, probably for bus             drivers or truckers. Directions could be used over and over. probably handed to the driver at the terminal or station when they are assigned the trip, second half of the roll gets the next driver back. 1392. Combination bottle opener and cork puller
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This looks very similar to a saw I saw once that was used to cut the slits for the frets in the neck of a guitar.
What is not clear though is if there is enough room at the ends to allow the two ends of the neck to clear the pillow blocks. Also, how does the neck slide under the saw?
I suppose that this devise could be mounted on top and the stock slid underneath it.
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    The neck is not involved at all in this one. The fretbord is a separate piece of wood (ebony or some other hardwood) which is slitted for the frets, and cut to length by the larger diameter blades at one end, and two blades from the other end.

    Proably so -- or under a board with slots cut for each blade and the board slid across the top of it.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Thinking about this... I suppose that you could mount this underneath a table and slide the stock over it. Kinda like a little gang table saw. Providing the ends could clear the blades.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

The multi-saw is to saw fret slots in the finger board for a stringed instrument neck. The finger board is about 1/4" thick, usually rosewood or ebony, and is glued to the neck after slotting.
--
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Bruce in Bangkok
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That I have not seen. The one I saw cut the slots into a full size neck. But what you are saying does make perfect sense.
How does this 1/4" material move over or under the blades? I keep thinking about making sure that the hand does not get near these blades.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

The spacing makes sense, except that the cut off blade inside the two last frets seems wrong...maybe it was put together in different ways for cutting fretboards for different guitars? I would guess it mounts below a table and fretboards are clamped into a sled that passes over it. The end blades cut to length, and the shallow blades cut for the fret wire Since the cut is so wide, something must push it through evenly or it will bind and destroy the work.
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The fingerboard would have to be mounted on a sled of some kind, to keep it true and prevent binding.
I have a special saw blade that I mount on my table saw for this process - it cuts a .023" slot. I attach the fingerboard with double-sided tape to a template that has a notch for each fret position. I have a miter gauge with a pin that goes in those notches. I have several templates for different scale lengths.
--Steve

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snipped-for-privacy@smcNOSPAMtek.com says...

Out of curosity is it practicle to make fretboards? I ask because Stew- mac seems to sell them cheaper then I'd think you could make your own? Unless it were a special length like the long neck banjos.

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Bruce in Bangkok
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It certainly is for me (practical to make fretboards). I usually buy fingerboard blanks from various sources or make them up by resawing thicker lumber stock. And some of my instruments have scale lengths you can't get from StewMac. Particularly 35" bass. I can get fretboards in a wider selection of woods from Luthier's Mercantile (www.lmii.com) but their radius and slotting services are expensive ($18 per fingerboard). So I do buy blanks from them, but I radius and slot them myself to save money. Thus I have two motivations: 1) it saves me money to make my own, and 2) it gives me flexibility in the types of wood, scale lengths, etc.
Sometimes I buy exotic lumber from local sources or from Ebay. Wood already cut to fingerboard size and thickness is quite expensive compared to the per-board-foot cost of similar lumber in standard sizes. And it's nice not to be limited to what certain vendors like StewMac and LMII offer.
--Steve

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snipped-for-privacy@smcNOSPAMtek.com says...

At one time I worked as a gunsmith and found that some jobs wern't financially viable - they took too much time and you just couldn't bill a large amount for the job. I had assumed that, other then unusual lengths, fretboards would fall in the same catagory - too many manhours for what you could charge to make one.
--
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Bruce in Bangkok
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The owner of this saw said that the blade spacing was set up for a mandolin, the link below is to a photo that shows how it was used:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/72593510@N00/2571866341 /
Rob
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Of course! A mandolin. <smacks head> That is why it is so short. I just got guitar in my mind and just did not think of anything else.
I should of got it because I have seen a similar setup for a dulcimer.
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Lee Michaels wrote:

The dulcimer I built was a one-off so I just cut the frets in by hand with a coping saw.
Stuart
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

Usually when building a guitar/banjo/etc. the neck is cut to shape and then a groove is cut down the top of the neck to hold a steel truss rod that strengthens the neck. The finger board, or fret board, slotted for frets is then glued over the installed truss rod.
--
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Bruce in Bangkok
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The slotting operation is done before the fingerboard is glued to the neck of the guitar. The two blades that are slightly larger diameter actually trim the fingerboard to length, while the rest cut the fret slots.
--Steve
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