What is it? Set 235

I'm having some computer problems today so I don't know if I'll be able to make an answer page, I'll probably just post the answers here in the newsgroups.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1320. Battery. 1322. Tubing clamp for rubber tubing. Thanks Karl
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wrote:

1322 is a Bunsen clip. Used on a piece of rubber tubing at the bottom of a burette. By squeezing the two plates together the clip opens and can be used to get very fine control over the flow of liquid.
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1320 is a wet cell.
1323 is a pre-Columbian Panavise <G>
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1320 wet cell- part of a farmers battery
1321 Dang! So what needs a wrench, a hammer, and something that hooks over the end (of whatever) that looks like a fat stick and gets pulled on?
1322
1323
1324
1325 whack it into a piece of wood or something soft, pull the trigger to advance the numbers and whack the next piece. maybe it gets thunked onto an ink pad between pieces.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Think "getting a tire onto its rim"
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wrote:

That is *DEFINITLY* not a bead breaking tool, or a tool used to mount a tire onto the rim. My folks had a tire store/car repair shop for 20 years, and I worked there as soon as it was legal (child labor laws). I've mounted my share of tires, using everything from a couple of screwdrivers to the latest (at the time) Coates tire changer. I've busted split rim, 2 and 3-piece truck tires, and earthmoving equipment. We even had a set of tools that came with an old Model "T" Ford truck. Nothng like this was ever used. There's just no way this tool has the shape to generate the leverage to do this kind of work. Normally, when breaking down a tire by hand, one would use a chisel-like wedge (or wedge-hammer) to break the bead (or a compound-action-lever squeezer- thingy), then a couple of long steel rods with small paddles (called "spoons") to pry the tire off of the rim. This somewhat resembles a tool used to remove/hammer on wheel weights though.
If Mike Rowe wants a true "Dirty Job" he should try busting down an old tube-type 20" rim/tire from a semi - by hand.
Wow, this brings back memories - it was 20 years ago this week that we sold the business. Dad had suffered a stroke several years prior, Mom just wasn't up to the fight any more. The corporation we represented (Uniroyal)changed marketing and dealer support. It turned out it wasn't just us, the independant dealer, having trouble. The distributer, the folks that also owned Otasco, also went belly-up later that year. Uniroyal is no longer an independant manufacturer.
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Thanks for your suggestion that it could be a wheel weight tool, I added it to the answer page, I also added this link to a tire bead breaking hammer:
http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/ken35429.html
The bead breaking part of the hammer looks similar to the tool on my site, though it is much longer overall. I've looked for the patent on number 1321 but so far I haven't had any luck.
Rob
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snipppppppp
With due respect, Rob, I have to disagree with you. What you've referenced to above is a wedge-hammer. The wheel/tire is laying flat on the ground, the side to be broken down is up. You put a little lube (usually a vegtable-based soap) on the rim/tire to be broken down, stand on the opposite side, and swing down like you're chopping wood. The hammer will skip off the rim and smack you dead on the shin. If you actually DO hit the tire/rim junction, the lube will splash directly up into your face, unless you're the new guy watching an older hand do this - in which case it will fly up into YOUR face.
There's just no way #1321 can be swung with any force to break a bead. The "hook" portion is shaped wrong and would not work to give leverage to either break the bead or lever the bead off of the rim. I printed the picture and am passing it around the neighborhood - lots of professional folks; carpenters, mechanics, a doctor, etc. Will let you know if I hear anything.
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When I first saw the wedge hammer, I thought it was slightly concave, but now that I've taken another look I've removed the link to it.

There are a few more people that I want to show this to also, hopefully someone will be able to identify it for us.
Thanks, Rob
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1320 Wet cell battery 1321 Tire tool/lug wrench for an old car or maybe motorcycle? 1322 Rubber hose clamp
1325 Stamp for something. Looks similar to a lumber graders stamp.
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1235 Lead-acid storage battery for early telephones.. Mason Jar, filled with acid, and this was the top, holding and elements
1324 Nutcracker - especially good on black walnuts, butternuts and shag-bark hickory
1325 Lumber marking thing, Set the numbers, swing it like a hammer, and mark lumber with indented numbers
Now, let's see what others guess..
Flash

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In article

Let's see...
1320 - Electrolytic rectifier cell, complete with electrodes this time but lacking electrolyte. Not a big deal, as that's typically just an aqueous borax solution.
This could possibly also be a salt water reostat, but the volume of liquid looks way too small for the power dissipation the contacts and electrodes would suggest it's designed for.
1321 - Special all-purpose wrench for some piece of equipment that performs all the usual adjustments? Kind of akin to the standard double-ended socket + screwdriver a lot of chain saws come with that can be used to make all usual field adjustments to the saw.
1322 - A very wild guess: a hanging loop for a mirrored ball
1323 - A vice to hold a watch when repairing or adjusting it, perhaps?
1324 - Mold for soap? or for explosives for some weaponry?
1325 - Adjusting tool to set the price of gas in a gas pump?
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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