What is it? CLXXIII

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As mentioned on my site, I'm travelling next week so I'll be posting on Wednesday instead of the usual Thursday.
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1001: Lightning creator ? 1002: Gear puller 1003: Some kind of sphere thrower. 1004: Snake loop for catching or handling snakes. 1005: Gopher killer 1006: ????????

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On Thu, 7 Jun 2007 05:25:40 -0400, Puff Griffis wrote:

Tesla Coil, of course :)
B.
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1001 Tesla Coil... Air-core step-up transformer. Excited by high frequency (high compared to power frequency). Primary has a few turns. Secondary is a long single-layer solenoid (so the insulation stress is limited). Relies on auto-transformer action to propagate excitatation throughout the length of the secondary. Produces flashy but useless demonstrations. Tesla's early work with multi-phase AC was wonderful engineering that changed our society, then he went show-biz, selling technically unsound ideas such as delivering electric power through free space. The Tesla Coil was a device used to impress gullible potential investors and audiences with the idea that electricity could move through space.

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Alexander Thesoso wrote:

Serendipitously, as I've been celebrating my 50th class reunion at venues in Ogonquit, Maine and Cambridge, Massachusetts all week, it appears that someone at my alma mater are still trying to sell that wireless power transmission idea, as reported in The Boston Globe yesterday:
http://tinyurl.com/2wgwdj
I don't doubt that schemes like that can work, but it's hard for me to believe that they'd be very efficient, so probably not practical for significant electrical loads.
Speaking of efficiency, yesterday SWMBO and I spent a few hours in and around the wackiest looking building I've ever seen firsthand, the new Stata building at my alma mater, funded largely by classmate, Ray Stata, and his wife:
http://web.mit.edu/evolving/buildings/stata/index.html
One of the more interesting things I learned about the building is that it has no interior space heating system at all. The building has superb thermal insulation. It has A/C to cool it down when needed, but the heat from the occupant's bodies and all the electrically powered stuff inside is sufficient to keep it "warm" even in the middle of a Massachusetts' winter. Imagine that...
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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<snip>
And no one mentions the physiological implications of living in that kind of a magnetic field... or the results of something else being introduced into the field that accidentally resonates...
Jerry
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1002 battery terminal puller
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1003: Clay pidgeon thrower for skeet shooting. Dave
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wrote:

In the early days of skeet shooting, they used glass balls instead of clay pigeons. They also had the advantage that if thrown over water, the missed would float and could be rounded up for reuse.
This would explain the direct throw (as opposed to a Frisbee sling) and the nets that go in the hoops.
Paul K. Dickman
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1004.....may have a different name if you were ordering it from the manufacturer, but the guys using it on the railroad call it a "hoop stick". It was used by the station agent or operator to give ("hoop") train orders to both the engine and caboose as trains passed, sometimes at very high speeds. The paper orders were attached to the device, and the operator then stood next to the rails where the train would pass and someone on the train would hook the hoop with his arm as the train passed. The paper orders were then detached and the hoop stick thrown back to the ground for the operator to chase after and recover for the next time. There was another type used that was made of the same materials, but in a "Y" shape. The orders were tied in the top of the Y with string, and only the string went so the operator didn't have to find the stick as he kept it in his hand.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario. (CNR SRB#750612-2)
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1001. Static Generator, Used to raise the single hair on my college physics professor's head.
1002. Adjustable puller.
1003. Previously mentioned, a clay pigeon thrower, early model.
1004. Poor performer yanker off the stage. Earlier versions looked like Little Bo Preps cane.
1005. Early version of TB test applicator.
1006. Handy Man of the Month Free Circle guide prototype.
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1001 Tesla coil 1002 Gear puller 1003 Skeet thrower 1004 Animal control hoop 1005 Animal identification applicator (puts holes/tattoo marks in ears or cheek) 1006 Wire gauge
Carl G.
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1001. Tesla coil. A pretty badly designed one too -- lots of obvious inefficiencies in its geometry.
1002. Two-jaw puller. Winding the screw causes the conical wedge to force the jaws in a pincer action, and also pushes against the end of the screw.
1003. Some sort of ball thrower? Target shooting? Dog training?
1004. Dog / badger catcher's noose
1005. Spiky thing.
1006. Transfer punches for blind holes. Leave them in the hole below, place the matching workpiece over the top and thump them. They transfer the hole's position as a centre punch mark, then you can drill it out.
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wrote:

I'm sure that this is some type of puller but some of the gear pullers and terminal pullers look the same so it's hard to say exactly which one this is, though I'm leaning towards terminal puller.

No one has answered this one correctly yet.

Sounds like a good possibility, have you seen one of these before or are you making an educated guess?
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 9&filter=dowel
Thank you for entertaining contribution; I always look forward to Thursdays.
Regards,
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wrote:

<snip>
In the initial picture, it looked very much like a set of transfer punches, viewed straight end-on. But, if you look at the close-up, it clearly is not. Rather, it is some sort of gauge plate where the circles, far from being the ends of punches sitting in a holder, rather are recessed into a plate. And the small circles in the center are holes, not points.
Jerry
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Very narrow and weak tips to the jaws, so it looks more like a battery terminal puller.
Hard to say though without knowing how big it is! If that thing's a foot across, it's clearly not for batteries.

Not exactly like that. Sets of many-sized through punches (parallel sided punches) are common in metal-bashing, but not blind punches. Blind punches are used in woodworking with dowels, but in sets of a standard size. I've not seen a graduated blind set before.
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1006 sewing machine needle gauge, and that's just a SWAG. Thank You, Randy
Remove 333 from email address to reply.
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R.H. wrote:

1005. A guess- A device used to puncture the outer layer of skin in order to administer a vaccine.
Kevin Gallimore
-
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Don Young
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