Waxing table surface

We have a large antique dining room table that I'd like to protect with wax. The base finish is shellac.
I've tried a variety of paste waxes over the years (Minwax, Butchers, etc.) but none give a really nice finish. Ususlly you can see swirls where the wax was applied. I've tried waiting the prescribed time (10 minutes or so) and tried wiping off immediately. I've tried small areas at a time as well as large areas. Nothing gives me the results I think the table deserves.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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Wax "is not" going to protect the finish. It will make it shine.
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On Nov 7, 6:48am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I've used the same products and always return to Minwax. If your shellac finish is clean and smooth, use a bulky piece of cheesecloth so you can distribute the wax evenly. I apply it as thin as possible - practically a film. You can always reapply a second coat and I usually do after buffing. The secret I've found is after the wax has "set up" buff it with a micro fiber towel and be sure to turn the towel constantly. The idea is to remove the wax. If you don't continue to turn your polishing rag, you will continue to rub the residual wax into the surface. When I was building furniture full time, I used an electric car buffer with a lambs wool pad. I would then use the microfiber for final finish. Remember that the wax will only make the furniture shine. It will help retard water spots, but if a wet glass is left on the surface, it will result in a white ring. This is easily removed with another coat of wax. Hope this helps.
Jimmy Mac aka: Jummy
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Swirls probably mean too much wax and not buffing correctly.
1. Wipe surface clean with naptha to remove all existing wax
2. Get some Briwax of appropriate color. Neutral is always OK.
3. Using 0000 steel wool or a maroon synthetic pad and in light handed swirling motion do a square foot at a time. Just dab a little wax on at at time. The Briwax will be wet with naptha and you want that wetness but it dries in a few seconds. Probably only a 1/4 tsp distributed on the pad to get started. I actually keep a can of naptha around to wet the pad without adding wax.
4. After 3 or 4 patches stop and wait for them all to get hazy. It might take zero time or maybe another 2 or 3 minutes. I would never leave wax on more than just a few minutes before I start to buff. Once it totally hardens it is just a bitch to get it all to melt and smooth out.
5. Buff like hell with a terry cloth towel folded into a hard pad. You need to generate heat. Fast and inline with the grain to avoid swirls.
6. Move on to the next area. try foe zero or minimal overlap and buff in the edges where the new patch meets the old.
You really want to minimize the amount of wax. At first it is diffiicult to have enough on the pad without getting too much on the table. Once you have done a few spots then just one little additional dob on the pad for each sq foot. If you see too much wax in one spot, go over it again with some wet wax on the pad to let the solvent break it down and the pad pick it back up.
Some folks put a gob of wax inside a few layers of cloth and then wipe it on that way but I haven't mastered.
On Nov 7, 6:48am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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