Water Spots in Sprayed Lacquer?

Years ago our family lived in a house in the suburbs. I did my woodworking in the basement, including sprayed finishes. I used polyurethane exclusively. Once I built a canopy cradle for our firstborn. I laid the polyurethane on so thick that years later somebody parked it next to a heater outlet in the house that the finish blistered. Sawdust getting dragged through the house and fumes coming up from the basement were a couple of reasons why we moved to the country.
Now, years later I am getting back into woodworking. The woodshop is now located on the second floor of an old carriage house next to the main house here here. Because of the age of the carriage house I will never be able to keep the dust down. So, I would like to get away from sprayed urethane and try spraying fast drying clear lacquers.
I haven't been able to keep up with the latest advances in finishes. I am, however, really concerned about water spotting problems that I have read about when using lacquer finishes for tabletops and so forth. Can anybody recommend a fast drying, state-of-the-art, lacquer that has either a minimal, or no water spotting problems?
Thank you in advance for the help.
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I am using Sherwin Williams product called CAB-Acrylic Lacquer. It is about 50 dollars a gallon.

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I also use the same product @ 30.00 Per Gallon Good product dry's fast and dry's hard, is also self sealing

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I've recently switched from M.L. Cambell nitrocellulose lacquers to M.L. Campbell water based Ultrastar.
Ultrastar is ~ $40 / gallon at my local store and very resistant to heat and moisture. It dries SLIGHTLY slower than NC lacquer, but much faster than any varnish. Ultrastar also sands and rubs out very much like NC lacquer.
M.L. Campbell also sells defoamer, flow additive, and anti-cratering additives, should you need them.
You cannot brush Ultrastar, a fact mentioned in every document M.L. Campbell prints, but lost in a recent FWW finish review.
All about Ultrastar: <http://www.mlcampbell.com/secured/pisheets/C599%20-%20ULTRASTAR%2010-18-05.pdf
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You guys are just the people I needed for advice last weekend. In the past I have used Sherwin Williams Nitrocelulose lacquer. Worked great. Recently I switched to their waterborne lacquer and corresponding sealer. I am using a Sharpe HVLP conversion gun. Right now I am spraying the base cabinets for a new kitchen. Since they are not seen after completion (exterior is hidden by other cabinets and interior is filled with drawers)I am using them to get experience with the new product. I had two problems that puzzle me. My sequence of operations was: Sand to 220 Wet to raise the grain Sand lightly to 220 Spray water soluble analine dye to color the wood. Wait 24 hrs Spray sealer Sand LIGHTLY to 220 --- THIS TOOK OFF SOME OF THE DYE -- Not a real problem because it will not be seen Spray 3 coats of lacquer - 1/2 hour apart with hand sanding to 400
grit between coats. I was using 65 psi air pressure, 15 psi fluid pressure at the tip,fluid wide open, reasonable fan
width, gun at about 10-12 inches from
the surface. wait 24 hours Light rubout with steel wool using Murphy soap for a carrier.
Questions: Do I need 2 coats of sealer or 1 heavier coat to prevent sanding out the dye?
The final finish is acceptable, but has a very fine orange peel finish. Does this relate to the sealer being too thin, or something in my technique?
Are the settings right for my gun??
Thanks, Len ------------------------
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snipped-for-privacy@uiuc.edu wrote:

I thought you weren't supposed to use steel wool with any water-based finish due to the possibility of rust?
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You can't use steel wook or tack rags in the finishing process - under the lacquer etc... But, after it is hard there is no problem with it.
Len ------------ Charlie M. 1958 wrote:

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I don't use steel wool, but I do use a tac cloth every time I paint a car. I have never had a problem in doing so. I know there is a lot of conversation around here about tac clothes, but I shoot a lot more paint than most here and like I said - I have never had a problem using them.
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The tack rag comment only applies to water borne products. Are you using water borne stuff on cars?
Len -------- Mike Marlow wrote:

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That would be an oops on my part. Didn't realize the comment was specific to water borne products.
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-Mike-
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Thanks to all for the help.
You have given me some places to start.
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