water based finishes

Now that the heating season is upon us here in the NE I have to find an odorless, non-toxic finish I can use indoors for some jewelry boxes I'm building for Christmas gifts. I've tried Minwax Polycrylic, but not entirely satisfied with it. Will someone please recommend another option?
I've read some in this newsgroup use Hydrocote finishes, but don't know which one would apply, or, where to purchase them.
I'm using red oak for some boxes and cherry/walnut on others.
Thanks. Paul P
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PEP wrote:

Some of the guys here recommend shellac for indoor safe use. Probably wouldn't be a bad choice for boxes that would not be roughly used.
What didn't you like about Minwax Polycrylic? I've used it on indoor furniture and floor cloths and liked it. But I like a matte or less a than satin finish on a lot of things.
Josie
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:08:07 -0500, "firstjois"

It did produce a nice finish after I rubbed it out, but I didn't expect to have to spray on four coats - on top of a coat of sanding sealer - to get it to fill the grain on my walnut piece.
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:08:07 -0500, "firstjois"

It did produce a nice finish after I rubbed it out, but I didn't expect to have to spray on four coats - on top of a coat of sanding sealer - to get it to fill the grain on my walnut piece.
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http://hoodfinishing.com /
You should use their Hydrocote Resistane for your project. Also you should consider the Amber Additive to tint the finish with. The solvent used IIRC is the same type of solvent used floor cleaners you buy at the store. There is some out gassing when finished but when dry there is no noticeable smell. Resistane can be brushed on, but spraying works best. Sand to 220 prior to application and 330 between coats. If necessary buff with a grey scotchbrite pad after finishing using a bit of the premixed/ready to spray "Murphy's Oil Soap" for lubricant.
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I have used Hydrocote with pretty good success. Highland Hardware carries it. SH
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Hi Paul' Worth a look. JG http://www.homesteadfinishing.com /
PEP wrote:

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I have used only water based finishes in my basement shop for the past 7 years. After trying many different stains and clear finishes, I find that I get the best results with Behr Eurocolour water based wood stain, and Carver-Tripp Safe-and Simple Super Poly. The Eurocolour stains are mostly dye based, with a small amount of pigment, and thus do not hide the grain of the wood. They dry quickly, can be blended to get the desired color, and I have even thinned them with Behr water based pre-stain and wood conditioner to lighten the color. The Carver-Trip Super Poly is self leveling, goes on in nice thin coats, and dries quickly so it can be recoated in as little as 2 hours. I usually use 2 or 3 coats of gloss and a final coat of satin finish to give a nice deep, non glossy finish.
Since water based finishes cause considerable grain rise, I sand the piece with 220 grit, remove all dust from the surface, then apply the stain with a brush or staining pad. After drying, I brush on the first coat of Super Poly, let it dry overnight, and lightly hand sand with a fine grit foam sanding pad to remove the grain rise. After cleaning off the dust I recoat with Super Poly. Depending on the wood, I may or may not hand sand between subsequent coats. I have used these products on red and white oak, maple, cherry, and Honduran and African mahogany with good results. I hope this helps. Paul Ketterer

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Perhaps your 1 st coat of finish is too thick.
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wrote:

Paul, you don't wet the piece with water, let this dry, sand the raised grain before finishing? This is what I've done with WB aniline dyes and WB Poly and there was very little sanding do to other than scuff sanding afterward. I learned this from someone who takes his pieces out in the yard and hoses them down.
Sanding off the raised grain before finishing supposedly keeps you from sanding off some of the color (if you're staining or dyeing). I wouldn't know, this is the only way I've done it and it worked for me. YMMV
TWS
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Using Resistane you don't have to.
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