warping of end grain


I'm make a bunch of end grain cutting boards.When I cut the glued up panels and flip them over on the end grain they all lift in the center, is there any way to minimize this?
Len
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I'm not trying to be an a**, Len, but isn't end grain pretty porous to be used as a cutting board?
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its ok, the end grain does not dull the knifes and does not show cutting marks much. You have to oil it well thought
Len

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C & E wrote:

Butcher blocks have been end-grain for a looong time. Some google searching will give you tons of hits for end grain cutting boards.
Chris
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Can you be clearer on the problem? I made two a year ago and they are as flat as when I made them.
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This sounds like a moisture problem which could get worse when using for the intended purpose. Also an end grain board could be somewhat fragile and prone to breaking. A few options: 1. Do nothing. Call it a design feature. 2. Make them thicker. 3. Cut them thinner and laminate to a long grain substrate. 4. Breadboard or spline all 4 edges.
Art

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Did you alternate grain direction of the pieces?
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I did alternate the grain, the wood was kiln dried and is 2 inches thick.before cutting the strips they were 4 square.Hard maple,cherry,honey locust..As soon as I cut them into strips each strip (about 2 1/8 inches thick) the center rises about a 32 to a 16th of an inch. this seems to be a pattern on all the woods.
Len
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Sounds like it might be a cutting problem. As I understand it, _if_ I understand it, the rise is along the long grain ([[[[ rise]]]])? You should be able to run the pieces through the tablesaw again, using the two-point contact first, and nibble them back to parallel.
If it's along the face grain (----rise----), no problem. Glue will do, so long as the thickness is right.
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leonard wrote:

I'm not clear from your description as to exactly when/where you are getting the deformation but dollars to doughnuts it is because the interior and exterior of the pieces have different moisture contents. Same thing if you resaw a board...the interior is wetter than the exterior and the thing will cup after resawing. The answer is...
After cutting, let the wood acclimatize again - it will pretty much unwarp itself in time. To be sure, cut it a bit oversize so it can be skinnied down after acclimatizing.
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