Want longer cord for Delta TS

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Crap! make that "Clueless" Greg
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Greg O wrote:

Try to stay current: the thread for the spelling-challenged was last week. ;-)
Bill
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A 3 hp single phase 220 volt saw motor will draw about 17 amps full load, which is already more than 14 ga wire is rated for, but the starting current of that motor can be 150% or more of the full load current, so a 14 ga wire is WAY TOO SMALL. You should be looking for wire that will carry more than 25 amps. A 10 ga wire is the right choice for a relatively short cable, but you should go to an 8 ga wire if the full length of the wire from the breaker panel to the saw will be longer than about 100 feet.
--
Charley

"fireant" < snipped-for-privacy@houston.rr.com> wrote in message
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To be absolutely safe, I would recommend a 4/0 AAC. Never mind that it's larger than the 15kV distribution conductors.
todd

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Charley wrote:

You are completely neglecting that the total current, on a 220 line, is split between the conductors, meaning you're all wet here. Jeez, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Even your 150% number is way off.

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wrote:

To fireant: If you have any question which of the above replies is more "all wet", by all means find and ask a local licensed electrician. The probability of gleaning coherent, accurate electrical advice from this thread has officially begun its dive toward zero.
To power my 220V machines, including my 3 HP Unisaw, I use a 25' extension cord made from 10-2 w/ground.
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Chuck Taylor
http://home.hiwaay.net/~taylorc/contact /
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LOL!! Greg
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Chuck Taylor wrote:
> To power my 220V machines, including my 3 HP Unisaw, I use a 25' > extension cord made from 10-2 w/ground.
That makes two (2) of us.
Lew
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"Chuck Taylor" wrote

Ditto here.
Max
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I am think you need the towel, Pop! Greg
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Pop` wrote:

You're confusing 220v single phase with 3 phase. In single phase 220 the current is no more "split between the conductors" than it is in 110v single phase. 17 amps goes out on one, comes back on the other, the direction reverses 60 times a second.
You're right that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Let's hope you don't burn anything down before you acquire more.

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Thanks for clearing that up. He had me confused when he talked about splitting the current too. I was locked in single phase thinking and it made no sense to me.
Tanus
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says...

No, it's not.
A 240V circuit looks like this:
(L1)---------+ | (load) | (L2)---------+
This is a series circuit. Current is the same at all points in a series circuit; thus, it's the same in L1 as it is in L2.

Bzzzt! Thanks for playing, though.

Only if it is mistaken for a great deal...
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Are you trying for a laugh here or what? Does the word "circuit" mean anything to you? What, you figure that on a 120 volt circuit the juice just stops at the motor? The other side of the circuit (there's that word again) just lays there?

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12 is adequate, but 10 is prudent, especially if you are a distance from the breaker box.
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I would stick with an extension cord rather than attach a 25' cord directly to your saw. It will only work with the saw if you attach it.
Something to consider, while many have stated that the 12 ga. will work fine, If you go 10 ga. you can use it to also power those larger pieces of equipment you may get in the future. I run a 4.5 hp Laguna BS on a 10 ga. Too big is not a problem, too small will be.
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Whoa. Ask a seemingly simple question . . . . which was what size power cord for a 25' run for a 3 HP 220V single phase tablesaw. Looked through Delta manual, and they recommend 14 ga up to 50'. Found a 12 ga 25' cord at WM which will cover my intermittent use. Thanks all.

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I would never have guesses that they would recommend 14 gauge cord for any length! The 3 hp motor must draw less amps than I figured. even though a 12 gauge cord is a good idea to help keep the voltage drop to a minimum. Any idea what the motor name plate states for amps? Greg
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Many other opinions have been expressed...some colorfully...howver, take this for what you will...
...I'm currently moving my equipment from my fathers shop to my own(finally) and I am running new circuits to the shop. They are 240v 20 amp for the table saw and the jointer. I tend to use very short cordsets on the machines...that is, no more than 12" from motor or cabinet to the plug...then run extension cord to the wall. In this case, I will be using 10ga stranded for both. Both draw no more than 10 amps running...about 14 amps on start up, so 12ga would likely work just fine, but I don't know what I may have in a year, so I'll still be set.
However, you 14-3 wire is not anywhere near large enough....unless you WANT to watch your wire melt before your very eyes! :>
Mike
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And your basis for this belief is -- ?
Let's be realistic, shall we? 3 HP is in the neighborhood of 12 amps at 220 V. That's not anywhere close to melting 14ga wire. Or the insulation on it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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