10 Foot Dryer Cord

I have to place a dryer 10 feet from it's plug in, breaker dedicated outlet. I would like to use this cord:
(Amazon.com product link shortened) ie=UTF8&psc=1
Some say this is safe, others say it's not. I'd like your opinion.
I currently have a gas dryer, but need additonal capacity.
Thansk.
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On 06/02/2017 10:51 AM, Boris wrote:

That should be just fine.
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On Friday, June 2, 2017 at 11:54:49 AM UTC-4, Boris wrote:

Why are some saying it's not safe? As long as the dryer is rated at 30A or less, I see nothing wrong with it. Using a 10 ft cord is a bit unusual, but as long as you locate it and use it responsibly, I don't see a problem.
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I agree with you. Those that say no are some amazon reviewers that insist going with newer code.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.invalid says...

What reason did they give for it not being safe ?
It is a 3 wire cord which meets the old standard. Newer rules say that the cords must be 4 wires to be safer, but the old 3 wire standard is ok of not upgrading the house wiring. Is that the reason ?
As long as the cord is rated for dryer service and the current rating is not exceeded, I do not see any problem. Seems that it has over a 4 star rating, so should be fine for your case.
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says...

(Amazon.com product link shortened)

Because it's not the standard 6' install, and it may overheat. I say they don't know what they are talking about. If the cord is same gauge as home 30 amp circuit, fine.

Some cite newer code, some say it will overheat.

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wrote:

Overheating is not an issue at all. The heat distribution from voltage drop will be exactly as it would be with a 3 foot cord and in a 10ga wire that is negligible anyway. Dryers only pull about 21-22a.

The only code would apply to the part in the wall. If a 3 wire receptacle was installed per the 1996 or earlier code it is perfectly legal to use. If you are in Chicago, there may be a 6' limit to any cord tho. That is just Chicago tho.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

It's a 3-wire receptacle, and the home was built circa 1978.

Where I am, I believe that rule does apply now, but only to homes built after 1996, or if it is a major remodel including service entrance wiring.

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On 6/2/2017 11:51 AM, Boris wrote:

The 3-wire cord (L1, L2 and Neutral) has no ground conductor so it connects the metal dryer cabinet to your power company's neutral wire. All is well as long as your power company neutral connection doesn't fail. If/when the power company neutral fails, the neutral's voltage can rise to near line voltage which means the voltage on the metal cabinet of your dryer will rise as well. Obviously an unsafe condition.
The 4-wire cord (L1, L2, Neutral and Ground) adds a ground conductor so that the metal dryer cabinet is bonded to your homes ground rod system. The neutral wire in the 4-wire cable is NOT connected to your dryer's cabinet. With a 4-wire cord, if the power company Neutral connection fails and the voltage rises on the Neutral, your dryer cabinet will remain at zero volts.
So, I guess your 3-wire cable is safe until you lose the power company Neutral connection...then things become not-so-safe.
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On Fri, 2 Jun 2017 17:19:28 -0400, Hooda Guest

Since the neutral and ground are bonded at the service entrance, that is a distinction without a difference. In fact, when the 3 wire plug was legal the neutral was required to originate on the same bus as the main bonding jumper.
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On 6/2/2017 6:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yah, distinction without a difference is a nice loophole around code. You can upgrade ungrounded receptacles by just jumpering the neutral to ground on the receptacle. Easy-peasy & cheap.
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wrote:

If the utility neutral opens, you are depending on the integrity of the grounding system either way. The exception for ranges and dryers came during WWII when copper was in short supply and they decided the danger of sharing the neutral on these particular circuits was minimal.The reality is there was never a significant body count for over a half a century but Phil Simmonds on the CMP that handles article 250 said the war was over in the 96 ROP and the NFPA panel agreed. The official reason was just to be consistent with the rule you imply.
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wrote:

It works - it is functional, but not legal.
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On Friday, June 2, 2017 at 8:30:00 PM UTC-4, Scott wrote:

o00_s00?

nects the metal dryer cabinet to your power company's neutral wire. All is well as long as your power company neutral connection doesn't fail. If/when the power company neutral fails,

ltage on the metal cabinet of your dryer will rise as well. Obviously an un safe condition.

o that the metal dryer cabinet is bonded to your homes ground rod system. The neutral wire in the 4-wire cable is NOT connected to your dryer's cabin et. With a 4-wire cord, if the power

your dryer cabinet will remain at zero volts.

Neutral connection...then things become not-so-safe.

u can upgrade ungrounded receptacles by just jumpering the neutral to groun d on the receptacle. Easy-peasy & cheap.
You can do it, but it's a code violation.
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On 06/03/2017 12:34 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Code aside, if it's safe to connect the neutral to ground on an electric stove then it should be just as safe to connect the neutral to ground on a standard wall receptacle.
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wrote:

Not exactly. The line to neutral load on a dryer or range circuit is a fraction of what it is in a pure 120v circuit, compared to wire size, so the voltage drop on the neutral (rise above ground in this case) is far less. There is also the problem on a 120v circuit that if someone swapped neutral and ground along the way, you are putting 120v directly on the case of your equipment and a 3 light tester will still say "OK".
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On Saturday, June 3, 2017 at 4:42:12 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And the probability of something coming loose on a typical Daisy chained circuit is a lot higher than with a homerun dryer circuit.
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if you want to use a 3 wire 220V system, I suggest you attach an additional safety ground wire to the case of the appliance and connect it to a metal water pipe of other good ground.
m
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Long ago I got a shock at work hooking up a network cable.
In those days we used shielded bi-ax. I had one hand on the end of the cab le and grabbed another cable to connect to the next computer downstream.
Well, the first computer had hot and neutral switched, and the case was hot . The second computer was wired correctly, and the case was at ground or n eutral (not sure - could be both.) So the cable shield made a path from ch assis to chassis.
If the first computer also had a ground connection, it should have tripped the breaker when we plugged it in. There was no separate ground wire on th at three prong/hole outlet. The safety ground was theoretically supplied b y metallic conduit, and there wasn't continuity all the way back. That sho ws one possible problem with not having a safety ground at the outlet.
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On Mon, 5 Jun 2017 07:26:10 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Since the 60s, most of those 6-30 three prong receptacles are actually connected to 10/3-wg Romex anyway since that was the standard way it was manufactured. If you look in the box, you may see the bare ground bonded to the box and the neutral connected to the receptacle. Because of the higher temperature/ampacity ratings, stoves may still be wired with SE cable (2 wire plus ground)
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