Walnut and Black Walnut Lumber?

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Are Walnut and Black Walnut lumbers the same? I have Walnut lumber that are lighter, darker and some mix and I read or heard somewhere that you could darken the light color walnut by applying Hydrogen Peroxide on its surface, is that possible?
Thanks for the information.
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Maybe. Black Walnut is certainly Walnut and Walnut could be Black Walnut. Black Walnut is also known as American Walnut. There are many different kinds of Walnut.
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Can get a bit different walnut if you're getting old orchard stock. They graft English on Black Walnut roots. Black walnut is the basically inedible nuisance that produces such wonderful purple/red/brown wood.

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Sun, Nov 21, 2004, 1:49pm george@least (George) burbled: <snip> Black walnut is the basically inedible nuisance <snip>
Inedible? Nuisance? You don't know what you're talking about.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
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(George) burbled:

Ya beat me to it JOAT. SWMBO would kill for some of them for cooking(nut bread, etc.) They *are* a pain in the butt to collect, remove the husks, and then they take a long time drying. Finally, they are REALLY miserable to crack & get the meat out(many nooks & crannies inside that shell, meat comes out in tiny pieces)!
--
Nahmie
The law of intelligent tinkering: save all the parts.
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Sun, Nov 21, 2004, 3:45pm snipped-for-privacy@madbbs.com (NormanD.Crow) says: Ya beat me to it JOAT. SWMBO would kill for some of them for cooking(nut bread, etc.) They *are* a pain in the butt to collect, remove the husks, and then they take a long time drying. Finally, they are REALLY miserable to crack & get the meat out(many nooks & crannies inside that shell, meat comes out in tiny pieces)!
We always put 'em out in the driveway (gravel) and ran over them for a few days, the picked them up, put in in one of theose net orange bags, and hung that in the garage for awhile. We used a hammer and a chunk of railroad track to crack them, then a nut pick. Very tasty tho.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
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Ahhhh...JOAT you bring back fond memories. We gathered 15 to 20 paper grocery bags of black walnuts each year. layed them in the gravel drive and ran the truck over them a buch to loosen the outer hulls. Then got black hands (even through the gloves) picking out the nuts which were laid out to dry then packed into bags for later use. Hours were spent with a hammer and brick to get a quart of nuts. But damn it, mom's cookies and cakes were worth it!!!!! English walnuts absolutely suck in comparison and I can hardly eat them. Now, hickory niuts....there was a waste of time and effort ;)
Dave Hall
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Tue, Nov 23, 2004, 2:10am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@cs.com (DavidHall) insanely claims: <snip> Now, hickory niuts....there was a waste of time and effort ;)
Obviously, you've never had a hickory nut frosting cake.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
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Naw, never managed to crack enough to make anything from :)
Dave Hall
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But absolutely necessary, for making a hickory daiquiri, Doc.
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Fri, Nov 26, 2004, 7:29am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (RobertBonomi) plagerizes: But absolutely necessary, for making a hickory daiquiri, Doc.
So that's where my book went.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
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Yeah, right.
(George) burbled:

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Uneconomic. Difficult to farm. Highly prized for cooking and flavorings.
And there's one maybe 80 ft tall, in my nephew's yard, that will likely need to come down next year. I've already got the sawyer lined up. ;-)
Patriarch
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

He is talking about the nut vs. the actual wood.
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Um which of the woods is edible? LOL
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Black walnut is the fruit, and it poisons and messes the ground with husks and shells,contains meat which is almost impossible to get out of the shell, and has a bitter taste.
That's why we grow the "English" walnut - to eat.

They
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Yeah, I was just jerking your chain... ;~)
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Sun, Nov 21, 2004, 4:16pm george@least (George) Black walnut is the fruit, and it poisons and messes the ground with husks and shells,contains meat which is almost impossible to get out of the shell, and has a bitter taste. That's why we grow the "English" walnut - to eat.
Actually, I believe it's a nut, not a fruit. I never saw it "poisoning" the ground. If we didn't get out there and get the nuts when they fell, the squirrels did, and left no husks or shells around. The meat is no problem getting out, once you've got the nut cracked, you just need a nut pick. I've never experienced any bitter taste.
I would imagine the reason "English" walnuts are grown is because there's more profit from them, it sure isn't the taste, they're the last nut I'd choose. Also, they're much easier to crack - I usually just take two at a time, squueze them in my hands, and crack one. I don't much care for their taste tho; plus, I find they often taste slightly bit bitter.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
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JOAT notes:

I think he may mean the husk, which oozes a very dark brown color when it is opened. Great dye, but the way. Toss those husks in a bucket of some kind of solvent for a couple days, and you can dye anything. IIRC, it was used in earlier days to dye clothing.
The husk is a PITA to remove, in my opinion, but farmers around here with walnut trees sell the nuts in quart mason jars for a pretty darned good price.
My wife gets angry when she buys "walnuts" and discovers they're the English variety. She feels they have too little flavor. And she's right.
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
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OK, how is that bird house book coming Charlie?
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