Veritas MK.II Honing Guide - Excellent

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It's been said before, and I would have followed up on those threads, but google tells me I can't, so I figured I'd start another. A couple plane blades, a full set of my best chisels and a couple of construction chisels are now perfectly beveled and microbeveled. It's so easy, so precise, and so quick to use. They've fixed the flaws with the original and then some. I couldn't be happier.
JP
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That sounds really good. I have tardive disconesia in my forearms and hands so anythiing that makes it easier to sharpen is a great help, I'll buy it, later though. Thinking about an electric Makita copy too (flat wheel with water).
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Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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AAvK wrote:

Once it's set up (it takes ~30 seconds the second time you do it) you just roll it back and forth across the abrasive. And the roller unit is big and stable. With your bad hands I'd strongly encourage you to invest in one.
JP
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Sounds too good.
AAvK
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I have an MK.II also, and I generally agree - excellent idea for a product. I've got some very sharp chisels as a result. However, I have a question... When I adjust the roller from regular to microbevel position, it seems to change the side-to-side angle of the blade. As a result, I always end up with long thin triangles for microbevels, unless I give the chisel a little tap to compensate. I'm pretty sure it's not that my blades are out of square (it's happened with multiple blades, and I've measured with a square). I'm also pretty sure it's not my stone, as it happens whether I sharpen on a water stone or 600-grit wet/dry on top of glass. I've been meaning to contact Lee Valley about this, and I have no doubt they'll take care of me - either giving me advice on how to correct the problem, fixing the jig, replacing it, or refunding my money. Before I do that, though, I was wondering if anyone else has noticed the same thing. Another interesting side note - last time I contacted Lee Valley with a question on this MK.II honing guide, I was wondering whether this could be used for skew chisels. Answer: not easily. A couple months later, I get a catalog with a brand new product - a skew chisel registration jig for the MK.II! That's a great company - not only does customer service communicate with other departments, but they actually do something in response to customer feedback! Keep it up, Robin! Andy
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Andy wrote:

Andy, my MkII doesn't have that problem. Maybe the inner shaft is bent, so that when you change the microbevel adjustment one side is lifting more than the other?
dave
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Andy wrote:

I don't have that problem. Maybe you should contact LV for a possible replacement?
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AAvK wrote:

I would point out that you still have to exert downwards pressure with this jig. If that's an issue, then one of the powered wheels is likely a better option.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

I agree. I don't really notice that I'm using much pressure except when putting on a new bevel or hogging out a chip, but a powered wheel would pretty much eliminate it. AAvK - if you are looking at powered wheels, don't overlook the Veritas offering. I believe it was recently highest rated in Fine WWing.
JP
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

I think Lee Valley is a great company, too, but I'm not so enthusiastic about its riteration of the honing jig. Like the first one, narrow chisels do not stay put. Maybe it's just me, but I doubt it, although I would feel better if I had a chorus. Do I?
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LDR wrote:

Robin's company makes a fine honing guide. They use a toggle clamp blade securing setup as on our "Sharpening Sled" honing guide. We also had customers bring up the issue of small chisels moving while honing. We added an abrasive surface to the blade contact area of our guide and have not had one issue since. Robin, I think the same solution for your guide would achieve the same results? Tim Queeno alisam.com "A-LEE-SAM"
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Hi LDR,
Narrow chisels and Japanese dovetail chisels can still be problematic. So perhaps a chorus of one.
There are a couple ways to mitigate the issue. One is to carefully tighten both sides down evenly and squarely. Tis the last part of that which affects narrow chisels the most. If the clamp bar sits askew even a little, the pressure exerted on the chisel from a side angle can/will cause the chisel to pivot if not downright move.
Aside from the above, another way to help is to glue a piece of fine sandpaper to the lower roller assembly, across the whole length, where the chisel back makes contact. I have used 180 grit. This works well.
On another trial, I glued a *very* thin piece of neoprene in the same location and I perhaps liked it better. One needs to select a very thin piece, thinner than the former jig had, which was too thick and squishy. That thicker piece only served to allow a certain amount of spring/twist which allowed a narrow chisel to twist anyway.
The above methods have helped many people, but not all. I have then suggested for narrow chisels to purchase an inexpensive side-clamp jig. They have their own bugaboos, but do work for the narrow chisels if they are not too short.
Take care, Mike
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snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid says...

Veritas evenly before giving up. The idea of using sandpaper did occur to me but I never acted on it. I was told at the last woodworking show in Portland,Or, that Lie Neilsen was developing a jig too. It will be interesting to see what they come up with. Larry

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LDR wrote:

I'm betting it will be outstanding. I asked Tom Lie-Nielsen what they used to factory hone plane blades, and he said a standard (grey, usually) side clamp jig. I wish I had asked about chisels.
JP
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On 25/04/2006 8:01 PM, MikeW wrote:

I've been happily using the older Veritas "sharpening system" for a long time, perhaps more than 15 years. The "new and improved" Mk.II seems way too complicated and prone to problems like this. I guess I just like simpler designs.
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this could be used for skew chisels. Answer: not easily. A couple months later,

LV will also be releasing shortly a new lower assembly with a cambered roller. Makes plane blades with a camber much easier to hone.
And I second the "Keep it up, Rob" sentiment. Like plow planes, the high carbon replacement blades, and ...
Take care, Mike
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On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 00:02:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@spam.invalid (MikeW) wrote:

owners of the MK.I jig when they complained about the jig? Well, they built a better jig and if I want to invest a 2nd time in a sharpening jig I can have the new and improved version, the version that actually works. They left their MK.I customers in the lurch. Sorry, no MK.II for me.
antoine
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Did you contact LV to ask if they had a trade-in policy for owners of the original guide?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

extra one for your toolbox." This, with a smile, at the ww show when I bought the new one.
I don't have the most gifted pair of hands, so it's hard for me to come down with both feet on this issue. Still, I'm really puzzled why many others don't have the problem of narrow chisels wandering.
I like the improvements made but they are trivial--imho--to making the chisel behave while being sharpened. Why did I go for the second one? Because of my good opinion of Lee Valley, which, in this case I'm truly sorry to say, was misplaced.
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Frank Drackman wrote:

Dave
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