Veneer cutter

Does any one know where to buy a veneer trimmer, in order to trim excess iron on veneers from the edge od boards. Its a hand held device that you just run along the edge of the board and it trims both sides flush with the board
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On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 19:39:12 +0000 (UTC), "Lawrence Zarb"

Here are 2 in the US. http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family%5Fid 01&giftúlse&mscssidŽ6561991AD0408ABDC4943054BF16A2 http://www.vandykes.com/product/02286821 /
Maybe they ship to the UK. But there might be a better option in the UK.
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Lawrence Zarb wrote:

Just use a coarse sanding block, followed up by a fine one. Takes minutes only.
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This would be the final step after trimming the veneer.
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Paul Mc Cann

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Paul Mc Cann wrote:

You can easily take off 1/8" with coarse paper.
The other thing is a router with appropriate cutter.
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Well I can't. 3mm is just enough to encourage one to go at it with vigour, with unfortunate consequences as the veneer on the panel itself is usually paper thin.
Besides there is usually more than 3mm to remove
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Paul Mc Cann wrote:

What's that old saw about bad workmen and their tools? :-)

Stanley knife will rough that off,. Or as suggested elswehere a good chisel.
If you want a good finish on anything it takes time and patience, not special tools.
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I just finished a project that used iron-on veneer edging. I bought one of those trimmer tools but ended up not using it. Depending on the grain direction of the iron-on veneer, it will either cut cleanly or tear off a chunk. Sort of like Russian roulette. I ended up sanding and cutting with a razor blade.
The veneer trimmer I used was sold by Freud but it's probably a generic item also sold by other manufacturers. I think it'd work great for cutting plastic edgebanding, but for wood, as least it my experience, it doesn't work well at all.
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what works best for me is a nice sharp chisel.
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If there is not much left hanging over, then I use a block plane to trim it off. If there is more, then I flip the board over with the veneer side down and cut it off with a veneer saw, then block plane to touch up the last bit. I've never tried the chisel way, so I can't compare. A good sharp veneer saw is cheap to buy and a joy to use.
Bernie
wrote:

excess
you
of
a
item
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snipped-for-privacy@equant.com says...

Many of these gizmos are available but very few work well IME when used with natural veneer. You have to observe the run of the veneer grain to ensure you trim along with it. If you attempt to trim against the grain then it is prone to splinter which can be a real PITA.
I prefer a small electric trimmer myself or a well tuned low angle block plane a la Lie Nielsen.
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Flip it over so the veneer to be trimmed is on a firm base and use an xacto knife, razor blade, etc.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Having tried this also I can say it didn't work well for me.You run the risk of cutting the veneer on the other surface
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wrote:

the advantage of using a chisel is that the blade has no flex. much easier to control than an exacto knife.
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How? You keep the blade flat against the edge. My favorite tool is a Steve Knight marking knife.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

An xacto knife has a handle which would preclude holding the blade flat to the surface in the scenario outlined above.
If the secondary surface is going to be used to guide the blade three is every chance of damaging it.
Been there etc. etc.
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I've done it and it works. Don't try and cut it all at once. Take several light scores to establish the line. I still prefer a marking knife (which incidentally has a thicker handle than an exacto knife).
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