Using existing wall studs to support lumber rack?

Planning on getting a lumber rack up soon in my basement, so I've been reading wreck threads on google about different types. Seems that for basic, cheap, yet effective, 1/2 in. pipe set into holes in 2x4 uprights is the way to go. For the size I'd need, roughly $45 in materials needed vs $106 for the next-cheapest solution I've found.
But I'm wondering... instead of attaching 2x4 uprights to the existing wall studs with lag screws, could a guy just drill the holes directly in the studs? And how much weight could I expect that to support - with no damage to the wall, that is.
It just feels wrong. Too much bending moment on the wall studs that way? I'm not sure. But if someone else has done this and his lumber has been up on that rack for years with no problems, I might try it. Otherwise I'll play it safe and add separate 2x4s for uprights.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did a sort of hybrid solution. I have a wall that's furred out from a foundation wall with 2x2' (making it a non-bearing wall) and then drywalled. I ripped 2x4's into 2x2's and screwed them onto the studs sandwiching the drywall. I then drilled holes through the "new" 2x2's, through the drywall and into the "old" 2x2's for 3/4" black pipe. This way, the new 2x2's take the vertical component of the load and the old 2x2's actually get an upwards component of the load. I also ran a 2x4 across the tops of all the new 2x2's and screwed it into existing floor joists. This way, the rotational effort on the new 2x2's isn't handled by the screws alone, it's mechanically handled by the top brace as well. I've got about 500 bd ft up there now and so far, so good.
I would not drill into the existing 2x4 wall and use it as my only means of support for a wood rack.
Good luck Rob
--


http://www.robswoodworking.com

"Keith Carlson" < snipped-for-privacy@mchsi.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would edit what Rob said, as my own comment, to read:
"I would not drill into the existing 2x4 wall" except for perhaps lateral stability.
Two reasons:
1. Houses have structural components, which are sometimes well planned, improperly executed, and generally subject to various inspections, in times future, with financial consequences. If someone second guesses you, and they likely will, they will want into your wallet, or that of your estate.
2. The second is less skeptical. You WILL change your mind about where things go in your workspace, and how your work flows. You should build in as many options, and as much flexibility, as you can, now, when things are on paper.
I will state that the ease of getting 8/4 oak planks down from 7' up, diminishes, somewhat, as we get older. The same can be said for the storage in the crawl space idea. DAMHIKT.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

wallboard into the existing studs and then screwed shelf supports to that. I also attached some tapered 2x2s from the floor up 4 feet to lean sheet goods against.
--
Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I sank my shelf supports directly into the existing studs, but it is carrying a light load, and it is cantilevered, so the load is also not pulling directly out from the studs. Still makes me nervous...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think you will be removing too much "meat" from the primary load bearing componets of your wall. I would not do this. The price of failure is high.
I hung my wood racks from the ceiling joists. I sandwiched the joists with 1x4's that hung next to the wall. The lumber carrying arms were made of 2x4's mounted between the 1x4's.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Keith,
Here is what I did in my basement shop for wood storage. It has advantages and disadvantages so take it for what it's worth. It is certainly a cheap alternative - and virtually no weight restrictions! (My steps are about centered on the basement.)
Our basement has 13 steps, under which the space is virtually unusable (in my mind), so I thought that it is a perfect place for wood storage. I dropped a few vertical 2x4's about every 4 steps, then ran some horizontals about every 2 feet - connected with some scrap plywood spaced every foot or so. The stored wood is viewed "on end" from my shop area. You can label the edges in an ideal world.
I use the top "shelf" for shorts, and work my way down to the 8 or 10 footers at the bottom. I put the PT stuff on the floor.
Just a thought.
Lou

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's an excellent thought. In fact, the area under the steps in my basement faces toward the shop area, and would even be in line with the CMS.
I hadn't even thought of it because a couple of years ago I told my son we could build a "fort" under there - if he helped. Hasn't happened, and he's outgrowing play forts so I may lay claim to that available space.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi again Keith,
Glad you thought the idea was worth considering.
To store sheet goods, I used the "less traveled" side of the steps and built a platform about 16 x 96 and about 6 inches above the floor. When I need a sheet, I slide it off toward the shop area. I wish that I would have used the storage system that I read about here a few weeks ago. It involved using a pair of 2x6's connected with some 1 inch dowels onto which some PVC tubing was slipped before assembly. This would make removing sheets a lot easier. I just used plywood.
Another thought!
Good luck!
Lou
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have poured concrete walls in my basement shop. I ran a row of 2x4 studs along one wall, anchoring the footer into the floor with concrete nails (damn, that Remington 22 caliber nail shooter is one hell of cool tool!) and the header into the ceiling joists (with nails). I then lag bolted some industrial shelving vertical metal supports onto the 2x4's. The shelf brackets themselves are 16 inches out from the wall and lock onto the vertical metal supports like a lot of your typical shelving on which you put your own 1x shelving. But it's industrial quality rated at 300 pounds per shelf bracket. I have 4 of these vertical supports installed, with 4 shelf brackets on each - theoretically that's 4800 pounds. I currently have it loaded up with 400 board feet of mahogany and 150 board feet of oak. Six months so far, and it hasn't fallen down.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what I did - "jacked" a stud right next to the real one and drilled into that one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used 1 x 2s screwed into studs, drilled holes for 1/2 PVC pipe 10" apart and cut 15" sections of PVC to fit in holes. (Not much room in garage) Holes were angled slightly 5 degrees and it works well for smaller loads.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.