using a flush trim bit without digging into wood

Everytime I've tried to do use a flushtrim bit to trim edgebanding on plywood, I end up cutting an ugly gash into the piece. I'm using a Bosch 1617, which is considered a medium sized router, and a CMT bearing bit.
I suppose trim routers, because of their weight, are best suited to this task but there are about a hundred other things I need to spend my money on these days (most notably, my newborn son!) Is there anything I can do to avoid "dipping" the router into the work? My attempts to keep it level invariably fail, and that's when I gouge my wood.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a 1617 also. I have used it a few times to trim and edge and it has always worked nicely. I don't know what to say, except you have to hold it steady.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a neat jig in shopsmith (as well as on the net somewhere) that helps routing on the edge. Sorry - but i dont have a link - but DAGS and you should find it.

on
My
wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The simplest and most effective approach I know of is to simply gang together several pieces of plywood or whatever so that the router base has a large surface to sit on. After that, the best addition is to use an offset router base so that you have some way of offsetting the router's tendency to tip as you turn a corner, etc.
Look here for more info: www.patwarner.com . I've bought several of his router baseplates and they are a great addition to my routers.
Mike

on
My
wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Get one of those tear shaped off set sub bases. They'll allow you to have more bearing area to rest the router on.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jerry Fangman wrote:

In a WW book I read the author uses the table saw instead of router for trimming edgebanding. He says it is faster and more accurate. The trick is putting a board on your TS fence that doesn't go all the way down to the table. Have the bottom of the board somewhat higher than the thickness of the edging.
Sorry, I don't recall which book.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Do you have a photo? Seeing the damage may provide more clues to what is going wrong.
I use that setup, with a different brand of bit, and don't really see what can go wrong.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use a Bosch 1617 sometimes although for trimming edge banding I prefer my laminate trimmer. The bit needs to be clean though. If you pick up any adhesive on the bearing surface of the bit it may damage the edge. I keep a can of adhesive remover out and clean the bit after each pass.
RB
B a r r y wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
See picture link, hard to tip the router over with this much control:
http://www.patwarner.com/images/offset_subbase_in_use.jpg
*************************************************************

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

on
My
wood.
If you are tilting the router base, or the edgebanding face is not square to the plywood face then you'll groove the ply. The setup I use on the router table is to bring the fence in to keep the shelf stock square to the table. To adapt this concept to a portable router, make a thicker subbase and drill/tap in a starter pin square to the subbase. Concentrate on keeping the ply face in contact with the pin.
In addition, retract the bit to the minimum required to clean up the edgebanding.
Luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jerry,
I've read some interesting responses to your post. This should be a relatively easy fix. Here it goes:
Get an offset base for your router. ( http://www.patwarner.com/offset_subbase.html )
If you don't want to buy one, make one. Get a flat piece of wood from your scrap bin that is at least as wide as your router's diameter, and at least twice as long. Drill holes to match your factory baseplate. Screw it onto your router. Put a handle or knob on the far end. That should eliminate the propensity to tip.
Chuck
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Two things:
Set the bit so that only the amount of blade needed for the trim is exposed to the wood.
On really thin stock(3/4") you should double or triple the width by adding scrap stock, to at least get a decent base for the router to set on.
Trimming edge banding requires a fair amount of practice.
Some times a block plane might be a better choice.
Jerry Fangman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think Pat has the most important tip here. If you don't expose too much carbide then if you tip it just stops cutting, and cannot dig in. First timers tend to shoot for centering the laminate on whatever amount of carbide the bit happens to have. That's way more exposed cutting edge that is needed.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

Bosch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Has anybody built the jig from the Router Magic book that configures the router to use the bottom of a straight bit to remove the banding waste and the sole of the jig riding on the ply

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greetings! On 19/04/2004, 11:31:58 PM, Jerry Fangman wrote:

Just a shot in the dark here, but have you tried to use a piece of scrap, equal to the thickness of your work piece, to support your router on the other side of the bit?
Regards,
snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca ICQ:135397134
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Are you the Peter Green of early Fleetwood Mac? Just had to ask
ICQ:135397134
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is difficult to balance the router on the narrow banding and move the router without tilting the cutter. If you are planing to do this trimming often, there is a special fence attachment for most routers with an offset space for the untrimmed edging available that will stabilize the router to the plywood face surface and keep the bit from gouging. With some 1 x 6s. 2 woodscrews and a little ingenuity you can devise one.
Chipper Wood
useours, yours won't work
ICQ:135397134
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.