Unique Problem With Air Tool...

Page 2 of 4  
Scott Lurndal wrote:

No, plain AL commercial cookware is extremely common. Fancy multi layer cookware is mostly for cosmetics and marketing to consumers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Teflon breaks down above 500 degrees, and I'm sure that some of the polymer is already loosening it's bonds before that. Pretty much all monomers are carcinogenic. Then again, so is sunlight, and probably jogging.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote:

Teflon begins to break down above 450 C, which is QUITE hot. And, it can be subjected to 400 C operation for YEARS with no detectable change.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Can't let that one by. Teflon is basically inert, including biologically, at room tempertures and you have to heat it quite a bit to get it to decompose. To glue it, the teflon surface has to be chemically treated to turn it into something not-teflon so the glue will stick. I've not heard about having to toss non-stick cookware that's had the surface damaged, probably happens anyway because it's a pain to use that way. The carcinogenic part is the chemicals used to make and attach the coating, not the coating itself. Just had a green spasm in the press about that in the last few months. A lot of current cookware is now silicone coated, just waiting for somebody to find a problem with THAT.
Stan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

"Coiled" teflon backup washers are pretty standard items in pneumatic and hydraulic components and they can be coiled into a groove. The air pressure should push the coil together enough to minimize leakage.
Also take a look at the V-ring seals on McMaster.com, they look like you could cut them and have minimal leakage as long as you stack them with the cuts located opposite each other as you stack them.
Another possibility on McMaster.com is the "Spring loaded PTFE shaft seals" which may have enough play to let you fit them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Who is this McMaster fellow? <grin>
I'll check it out shortly. Seem like good options. Thank you.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 15:04:45 -0400, Joe AutoDrill wrote:

Can you heat it up? (I suspect not -- I can't recall teflon getting significantly more pliable with heat).
Are there alternatives to what you have that are pliable and slippery? (I can't think of any, at least none that won't be impregnated with something nasty, but I thought I'd toss out the notion).
Can you make a long split ring with a feature on the inside to engage the o-ring groove on the quill, and a serpentine cut that gets squeezed closed when you put the rig into the piston?
You may be able to make a ring with a feature that's big enough to snap into the o-ring groove and stay, but shallow enough (and maybe tapered) enough that the ring will expand over the quill -- like this, with all due allowances for ASCII art:
.-----------------------------------. '-----------. .--------------' '--------'
.--------. .-----------' '--------------. '-----------------------------------'
If your quill is chamfered enough on the end you may even be able to retain sharp edges on both sides of the ridge.
--
www.wescottdesign.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe AutoDrill submitted this idea :

For the shock on dirt bikes there is an o-ring covered by a teflon (I think) seal. The o-ring pushes the seal to the cylinder wall. The seal can be installed by warming in a microwave. It can also be cut with a Z shape. Usually the seal doesn't wear out, but the o-ring loses its elasticity over time. Those shocks get pretty hot. I wouldn't think the o-ring in your application would be subject to as much heat. Also they are sealing oil, not air, so a cut might be worse.
Wayne D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

You make a helical slit in the seal. When stuffed in the bore, and constrained by the groove in the ram, the tapered ends of the seal press together. I'm sure there is a fixture or tool to do this, but I have no idea what it would look like. But, custom seals like this are a fairly common device, so there must be a standard tool to cut the ends.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 14:26:47 -0400, "Joe AutoDrill"

Is the MTBF on this unit significantly less than other elements of the system that have a similar, or greater replacement cost?
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unknown.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/autodrill

V8013-R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 16:02:07 -0400, "Joe AutoDrill"

It would be interesting to know this.
"Failure" could be an applied metric that references PSI needed to cycle, or a specific cycling rate. At a certain point either of these could become critical to the proper functioning of the system.
If your unit has a MTBF that is in line with other elements of the system, it would be reasonable to conclude that there is a MTBF for the system as a whole and that the replacement of your unit would be covered under general maintenance, making your product immune from being singled out as the primary cause of system failure.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not a concern. They are happy with the unit and are even happy sending it back to us for rebuilds regularly... But I always look for a bettr answer for my customers. No need to shaft them if there is a simple answer out there someplace. I sell enough untis that rebuilds don't make a difference between cold cereal and steak for dinner.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 16:10:48 -0400, "Joe AutoDrill"

I think that you have an honorable intent, Joe, and I won't belabor my point beyond this post.
However, if the system has a MTBF and, if your unit is overly engineered, or overly manufactured, making it the most costly part, that might outlive the MTBF by many times - I don't think that you are doing anyone a favor.
There are mission critical systems and mission critical components of those systems.
If your component is going to get tossed at a thousand hours, and you made it to last ten thousand hours, at a cost of fifty percent more than one that would last a thousand hours - I don't think that you are shafting the customer by staying with a unit that lasts a thousand hours.
As always,
YMMV
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Joe: I don't have a solution for you but I would like to say I like your attitude regarding improving your product without the user bitching. A rare attitude in today's business world. If I ever find myself in need of your type of products I will jump your direction.
Stu Fields
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks Stu. The way I see it, it's the only proper way to do business anyhow. I appreciate the compliment.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/autodrill

V8013-R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

You didn't say what you're using for a seal now. There are a zillion materials out there--kind of hard to make a suggestion until one knows what it has to beat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Buna - Rubber. Standard Parker item. Nothing special. One cup seal and one cup seal with wiper lip.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/autodrill

V8013-R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe AutoDrill wrote:

If you're working with Parker best thing to do is give 'em a call--they're very big boys and they've got a bunch of formulations including some that are pretty exotic. Odds are that they'll have just the thing for your application.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Went to them before coming here. Because our application is in a closed groove, there weren't many options. ...Or maybe I just got a bum rep. with little knowledge of products. :)
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.