Unique CNC Based Woodcarving Business

First, I must apologize for making an ON TOPIC post.
I saw this article on the bottom of a page I was reading about something entirely unrelated. This gave the story and background of a "pure" artist who became "corrupted" with the use of a CNC machine. I tried to include the link but the publication does something so nobody can go to the article. Any way, I looked up his website and was just enthralled. He has a lot of images and you have to work a little bit to find all of them. Absolutely gorgeous work! Technology meets artistry. I don't know how artistic Robatoy or Larry are, but they should get some inspiration here. His business is called Carveture and here is his website.
<http://carveture.com/index.php
I am wondering what type of CNC router he has and the software he uses. It would take enormous amounts of time to do this sort of thing by hand, if even possible. I totally approve of this sort of thing. Here is a gifted artist who went to the CNC machine because he could create art that otherwise would have been impossible. I can't think of a better reason to buy one of them new fangled machines and make some art! I feel that even if I had a CNC machine, I wouldn't be making this sort of thing. His name is Joe Valasek and he works in Eugene, Oregon.
Enjoy.
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in message

an original for molds to be cast into bronze. So he can crank out an automated original, quick and fast. Then they make the bronze version of it. I never thought of this kind of use of a CNC machine. It makes sense though.
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"Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote in

I only glanced at it, but Oh, WOW!!
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Best regards
Han
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Nice work. I noticed the bronze.
I suspect this isn't a simple 3-D router design.
I suspect it is a 5-way CNC Mill (talking about big bucks).
The humpback did that for me. Multi-level fine detail meaning a complex CNC that can make propellers and other very complex designs.
Meaning Boeing Aircraft would have them, many machine shops have them and many of those are in money trouble with work going overseas. So some of these machines are going for the loan amount left on the books...
One of my net friends was a major designer in the aircraft business. His last design was the Shuttle three nozzle engines. That kind of big cad. The company was selling the machining centers to get bigger and better ones. The projects that cranked out for his pool and barn were something. Then he bought a funt-end loader with a bucket kit. He built the kit and improved a few designs on the way - having the CAD cut them out not a torch and grinder. He dug flower beds around the small ranch he owned - his neighbors...
Martin
On 8/19/2012 7:21 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

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On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 20:21:34 -0400, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

Very cool. Thanks for the thoughts and the link, Lee.
-- The business of America is not business. Neither is it war. The business of America is justice and securing the blessings of liberty. -- George F. Will
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Lee Michaels wrote:

There are those who are using CNC machines to make AR-15 "lowers". The "lower" on this semi-assault weapon is the part comprising the trigger group and is that part of the weapon considered the "gun" part by the feds. Every other part of the weapon (barrel, breach, stock, sights, etc.) is considered an attachment.
The "lower" is the part that has the weapon's serial number and is registered. It is the part that must be transferred by a Federal Firearm dealer.
Now if one can make an AR-15 lower in the garage with such a machine and a solid block of super-plastic, one can stay completely off the registration grid.
About the cheapest "lower" I've seen costs between $100 and $300. So all those folks crafting their own are simply trying to save money (wink, wink).
Point is, another reason for the machine is to create a finished product and save some money.
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