Ultimate sawhorse

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The big blue box store is practically giving away the Jawhorse miter saw attachment for around $20. I bought one even though I don't have a Jawhorse because it came with some rollers that clamp to 2by lumber and some nifty right angle clamps for 2by lumber.
I started googling to see if there are any new ways to build a sawhorse since one of our own came up with those three legged things and came across this design: http://www.woodshopdude.com /
I plan on buying the plans unless someone here has a link to a better design
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On 1/4/2012 8:28 AM, Limp Arbor wrote: ...

What's to plan? Cut a notch, bolt legs together, done...
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The guy obviously spent a lot of time on the design and making the video & website and is trying to make a few extra bucks. I just downloaded the plans for $5 and they are well done. Step-by-step instructions with pictures and cutout templates for the notches.
I would have gone through at least two 2x4s trying to duplicate them so why not reward somebody for a great idea at a fair price?
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On 1/4/2012 10:15 AM, Limp Arbor wrote:

Why? That's what cardboard or some other trash material is for.
Sure, they're a pretty nice idea but nothing that really takes any serious amount of plans for. If you want the plans, for it (I gather you already did) and I've nothing against the guy for trying...
It does seem like a lot of effort for $5, though... :)
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"Limp Arbor" wrote in message wrote:

The guy obviously spent a lot of time on the design and making the video & website and is trying to make a few extra bucks. I just downloaded the plans for $5 and they are well done. Step-by-step instructions with pictures and cutout templates for the notches.
I would have gone through at least two 2x4s trying to duplicate them so why not reward somebody for a great idea at a fair price? =========================================================One thing that I have never seen on a sawhorse that they should all have. An adjustable leg. A tripod will sit solidly on uneven ground. Four legs are likely to rock. Make one leg adjustable to take care of that problem.
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CW wrote the following:

Cut one leg off. :-)
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 1/4/2012 3:27 PM, willshak wrote:

That's what "everybody" has that Cat w/ the 'dozer blade for, isn't it? Make a flat spot for the sawhorse... :)
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"CW" wrote:
=========================================================> One thing that I have never seen on a sawhorse that they should all

Break out the design Morris posted some time ago.
Lew
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On 1/4/2012 3:54 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I knew I'd seen at least one that had the feature--that's probably it.
Too bad Morris isn't around much any more; was always interesting stuff...
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I have seen folding tables that are meant to be used inside with a short leg and a bolt running into the bottom for adjustability. Obviously that wouldn't work on dirt.
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I like to be thorough but 18 pages to build a saw horse? I would hate to see his plans for a chest of drawers.
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On 1/4/12 10:58 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Wouldn't a "measured set of drawings" (copyright Norm) be more than sufficient for that thing?
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Limp Arbor wrote the following:

I have the plastic folding kind. Lighter than wood and can be stored away in less space.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 1/4/2012 9:28 AM, Limp Arbor wrote:

Neat idea, you have to give him an 'A' for effort. Now if he eliminates the bending down to fasten a strap thing to something reachable *while standing* then I'll give him an 'A+'.
John
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On 1/4/2012 5:26 PM, John wrote: ...

Yeah, the weakness in that design is that the legs have to be held together to hold the crosspiece in place--they want to go the wrong way under load.
The switchable tops is kinda' a neat feature, though, I'll grant him that.
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Looks like under a straight down load it is not going to want to push apart because the top sits in a notch with the pivot point below. http://www.woodshopdude.com/uploads/2/7/0/7/2707201/5524296.png?380
After I put a set together this weekend I'll report back how tension is on the strap.
I'm also not sure why the designer has the legs put together the way they are. I would think maybe having the legs on one side be inside legs and the other side be outside legs might also work. Maybe they need to be that way because they splay out...
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On 1/5/2012 7:33 AM, Limp Arbor wrote:

Yeah, the tension strap is going to be necessary to keep the unit from collapsing under any kind of wiggle and load.

There will not be much tension at all, it only needs to keep the legs from spreading farther. BUT if you want a tight fit, the straps will need to be tensioned quite a bit and any compression in the wood will require further adjustment of the straps.
This is a cool idea but solid stops will be needed. Perhaps a board that lays across the tops of the bottom rails that has stops on the ends to prevent the legs from spreading out.
The big flaw here is that the more weight you add the more loosely everything will fit.

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On 1/5/2012 7:33 AM, Limp Arbor wrote:

The load is still transmitted to the ground down the legs and there's a horizontal component as well as vertical owing to the angles. That's resisted only by friction on ground w/o the strap. It may be reasonably stable if the angles aren't too severe and the surface is rough, but the force is there and has to be resisted...

Makes no difference as far as the spreading force goes...I presume he did it for symmetry and to make the footprint the same for both sets of legs--if both were inside on the one side, that side would have a 3" narrower spacing than the other two owing to the thickness of the tubax'es.
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On 1/5/2012 7:33 AM, Limp Arbor wrote: ...

Well, let me make a guess... :)
From a crude guesstimate of the angles from the end-on view of his video, it looks like roughly a 70 degree angle of the legs to ground.
So, cos(70) = 0.34 or let's say 1/3 for "close enough"
If it's loaded w/ 100 lb uniformly, that would be only 25 lb/leg and only a third of that would be horizontal or roughly 8 lbf.
Not a lot; granted, the problem is that w/o the strap it would want to spread if anything upset the balance at all to raise a leg from firm ground contact so friction force went away.
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They do want to push apart.

Does not require much tension to make them stable.

Looks to me like the reason the legs are laid out the way they are is so you only need one set of templates to drill the holes (plans come with cutout templates for the top end of the legs). If you wanted to you could make the two inside legs open left and the outside legs swing right. The pivot point is critical otherwise the notches won't line when the legs are open. I suppose you could cut the legs and clamp them in the 'open' position then drill the bolt holes to avoid alignment trouble.
Once open and strapped these things are strong and stable. The legs are splayed out in two directions to aid in stabilizing them. I used 1x4s for the cross braces since I had some laying around and just screwed them to the legs. I planned to remove/glue/reinstall them but they are so sturdy I didn't bother. If I was using them for work everyday I would probably notch the legs and glue/screw them in place.
They obviously don't fold up as small as my yellow steel horeses but they are lighter and just as stable. My yellow folding ones don't get much use because they are too low for me to use w/o extending the legs. If you have ever used these you know that they don't fold up completely once you extend the legs. (not mine)
http://mike.creuzer.com/uploaded_images/DSCN5925-789646.JPG
Overall great idea.
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