UHMW plastic question

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Anyone have any way to get a thin (no more than 1/8" thick) piece of UHMW plastic to stick to either wood or preferably aluminum? Screws etc would deform the plastic too much and I need the plastic to be smooth anyway.
Thanks,
Wayne
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NoOne N Particular wrote:

For adhering plastic to metal "This to That" (Glue Advise) suggests:
LaPage's Metal Epoxy J-B Weld Faststeel Epoxy Putty (if you have gaps to fill)
http://www.thistothat.com/cgi-bin/glue.cgi?lang=en&this=Plastic&that=Metal
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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I forgot about that site. Thanks for kicking that brain cell around.
jc
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The guys are pretty clever with this stuff;
http://www.crownplastics.com/woodworking.htm?snti=4-10-0
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The say "plastic" but there are thousands of compounds of plastics. Nothing sticks to polyethylene very well. Test it first (put a blob on the plastic) so you won't be disappointed when the cured adhesive pops right off of it.
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I've used contact cement for adhering UHMW slider pads to my table saw fence. It has been suggested that having a rough glue surface on the UHMW plastic helps adhesion. -- JeffB remove no.spam. to email
NoOne N Particular wrote:

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On Mon, 03 Mar 2008 16:58:10 -0800, NoOne N Particular

make a "track" or "channel" on the edge od the aluminum and slide the UHMW in. Not too much, glue-wize, will stick to the stuff unless you really rough it up.
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"NoOne N Particular" wrote:

You have two (2) chances, slim and none.
You can try to scuff up the UHMWPE and aluminum surfaces with some 24 grit and a right angle sander, then apply some epoxy thickened with micro-balloons.
May work short term, but don't bet the farm on it.
Lew
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I have been fighting with that stuff for decades. In many commercial applications, such as butcher shops, UHMW is an ideal product to protect knife-edges from dulling and can be cleaned/sterilised easily.
You can attach UHMW to UHMW with heat, but cohesion at a molecular level is nigh impossible in any other way. Adhesion, as you pointed out, can be done, but eventually will fail under load.
So I resort to t-nuts, or drop-in slabs into a recess and I have even used sliding dove-tails.
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Perhaps second only to PTFE in adhesive difficulty.

How do you sterilize it? Last I heard, bacteria hid down in the knife cuts where the sterilizing agent couldn't reach it.
--
FF


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wrote:

IIRC the material is "sterilized" during the manufacturing process. The sterilization component is mixed into the plastic for a life long resistance to bacteria. These products are advertised on the packaging as being anti bacterial. IIRC not so much easy to sterilize if it was not made for that purpose in the first place.
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wrote:

That is true for all work surfaces like that. Stainless is a good one for 'ultra-clean'. Bleach, however, cleans UHMW tops well enogh to pass inspection. If the grooves are too deep, the top is discarded and replaced. Bandsaws have pretty much stopped the art of 'cleaving', so deep grooves aren't that common. Sterilizing a bandsaw is a job-and-a-half. UHMW wouldn't fly in a 'true' sterile environment, such as an operating room.
I read a study once where a maple butcher block came up ahead of UHMW in terms of 'clean'. That one was cured properly from day one with oils.
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http://www.crownplastics.com/bondable.htm?snti=3-1 Bondable UHMW UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight) Pressure Sensitive Tapes and Materials (P/S)
Crown's UHMW pressure sensitive tapes and materials are supplied with high quality rubber and acrylic based adhesives available with a Kraft or Poly liner. We process and treat the UHMW so it can be bonded to a pressure sensitive, adhesive backing, which eliminates the need for mechanical fastening and reduces waste. This aggressive adhesive has a high initial tack for ease of application and excellent peel for long service life.
Pressure sensitive UHMW Tape with acrylic based adhesives have a low coefficient of friction, are slippery, and ideal for applications that require abrasion resistance, wear resistant surfaces, or low friction.
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"Robatoy" wrote:

I have been fighting with that stuff for decades. In many commercial applications, such as butcher shops, UHMW is an ideal product to protect knife-edges from dulling and can be cleaned/sterilised easily.
You can attach UHMW to UHMW with heat, but cohesion at a molecular level is nigh impossible in any other way.
So I resort to t-nuts, or drop-in slabs into a recess and I have even used sliding dove-tails.
Think you are close to a solution that will allow clean up to meet FDA sanitation requirements.
Form the recess so the corners are not trapped and drop the UHMWPE in place.
Can be lifted out for cleaning thus cleaning the counter recess as well as the UHMWPE piece.
Fit the cavity with a drain channel to the sink to make cleaning the recess easier.
Another approach for free standing applications would be to fit a piece, say 3/4 x 3/4 around the outside edges of the UHMWPE sheet, similar to top construction, leaving the corners open.
Drop on top to use, lift off to steralize.
That will give you something to shoot holes thru for a while.
Have fun
Lew
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I don't know but I would try 3m 77 on both the UHMW and the other surface. Epoxy definetly won't bond to UHMW..
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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These guys sell adhesive backed UHMWPE films from .005" to .031" thick. http://k-mac-plastics.com/uhmw-sheet-general-purpose.htm If that's too thin you could try contacting them and asking about the adhesive.
Art

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Jet used to glue this material to the 3 clamping surfaces on their t-square Bies clone fences. And it is on the bottom of the far end of the fence so that it will slide easily on the TS surface. They no longer us this material and have replaced it with another type material. Having said that, mine have been holding on for 8 years but are showing signs of creep. Give Jet a call and see what they recommend.
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On Mon, 03 Mar 2008 16:58:10 -0800, NoOne N Particular

Try these folks http://www.crownplastics.com/?OVRAW=uhmw%20tape&OVKEY=uhmw%20tape&OVMTC=standard&OVADID 13969521&OVKWID959763021
Getting UHMW to bond to any surface is virtually impossible but these guys make a tape with a peel and stick surface that works pretty well. Good luck.
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On Mar 4, 10:00 am, tom(REMOVE) snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net (Tom) wrote:

Polyethylene-UHMW (Standard) Natural White Colored Sheet General Purpose Thickness     Length     Width     Natural Stock #     Natural Price     Natural Purchase Online     Black Stock #     Black Price     Black Purchase Online .005     12     12     KS-6393     $14.95     Adhesive Backed     -     -     - .007     12     12     KS-6406     $17.03     Adhesive Backed     -     -     - .012     12     12     KS-6414     $17.88     Adhesive Backed     -     -     - .022     12     12     KS-6404     $33.91     Adhesive Backed     -     -     - .031     12     12     KS-6403     $33.60     Adhesive Backed     -     -     -
http://k-mac-plastics.com/uhmw-sheet-general-purpose.htm
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rubber adhesives Rubber Adhesives for UHMW
Rubber based adhesive systems typically offer the highest adhesion and shear properties in comparison to acrylic or silicone. They are best used in ambient, indoor applications as rubber adhesives are susceptible to UV and elevated temperatures. Since rubber adhesives are very aggressive, they will work with a wide variety of substrates and satisfy most adhesion requirements.
acrylic adhesives
Acrylic Adhesives for UHMW
Acrylic based adhesive systems are more versatile than rubber based systems and provide a host of attributes such as UV stability, higher temperature performance and good to excellent chemical resistence. While rubber based adhesives have a higher initial bond, the acylics go through a 24 hour cure cycle or "wet-out" period where over time, the bond continues to improve. Acylic systems are usually a little higher cost but offer longer life than rubber adhesives.
silicone adhesives
Silicone Adhesives for UHMW
Silicone based adhesive systems are primarily used for application requiring very high temperature resistence or for applications where the adhesive will be bonding to a silicone filled material. These sysems typically do not possess high adhesion and would only be recommended for thin films where thermal expansion or shear will not not be an issue. Silicone adhesives are also high priced which may exclude them from competitive situations.
http://www.crownplastics.com/adhesive.htm?snti=2-2-0
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