Tried & True finishes

Has anyone here had any experience with "Tried and True" finishes?
http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/products/
They are based on polymerised linseed oil but are non-toxic before and after curing. One uses very, very little and they appear to take a very long time to cure. I prefer non-toxic finishes on my turned bowls and they appear to be OK on side-grain but hopeless on end grain as the minimal amount of oil just disappears immediately and doesn't seal the pores for subsequent coats.
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On 10/16/2015 2:41 PM, graham wrote:

You do realize that shellac is non-toxic. They use it on pills so they go down your throat easier.
For food bowls, what about mineral oil or shellac?
--
Jeff

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On 16/10/2015 12:46 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I prefer a somewhat water resistant finish and shellac doesn't provide that. I do use a mineral oil + beeswax finish on some salad bowls but people like a more resistant finish, especially on the outside where they like it a bit shiny as well. Graham
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On 10/16/2015 11:17 AM, graham wrote:

A lot of people think that, but I've found it not to be particularly accurate. I remember reading about a canoe builder that used shellac as the finish on his canoes. It wasn't dewaxed shellac, so darkened the wood a bit more but it was plenty waterproof.
As an experiment years ago I turned a bowl and finished it with shellac. I ate hot soup out of it with no particular damage to the finish. I can't remember if I used blonde (dewaxed) or amber shellac. For a salad bowl shellac is a perfectly good finish. Certainly much more so than an oil finish (excluding oil based varnishes obviously).
...Kevin
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Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
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On 16/10/2015 1:58 PM, Kevin Miller wrote:

Thanks. that might be worth trying on the outside of the bowls. Graham
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On 10/16/2015 1:46 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Some foods have alcohol introduced, might melt shellac.
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On 16/10/2015 8:43 PM, Leon wrote:

I don't think shellac would last long in a salad bowl. Graham
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On 10/16/2015 2:41 PM, graham wrote:

I've used it with good results, but not on a bowl so I have no idea how it will work for waterproofing. Seems like it would take repeated applications. I've used mineral oil on cutting boards and it also takes a few applications before I trust it with water.
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On 16/10/2015 2:36 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

So far the outside of the bowls have had 6 or 7 applications and there is no end in sight. Graham
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graham wrote:

I use Lee Valley Polymerized Tung oil. I wipe it on with a folded paper towel, wipe off excess and it dries to touch overnight. Then I use 4-0 steel wool on it the next day and apply shellac/wax finish and buff. Have been using this for years on bowls with a prominent figure to bring out the figure. Never any problems.
If the wood has large pores a grain filler may be helpful.
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GW Ross

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I have always understood that Polymerized Tung Oil is not for food contact items .. < because it contains mineral spirits ? > John T.
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On 10/16/2015 01:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

Conventional wisdom is that any modern finish is food save after it's fully cured, as the nasty stuff has evaporated. That can be up to 30 days or so.
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Juneau, Alaska
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snipped-for-privacy@alaska.net says...

May be "conventional wisdom" but that doesn't make it so. The problem with many oil-based finishes is that the substance that makes the oil cure contains toxic metals. That substance does not evaporate.
In any case, Lee Valley states specifically _not_ to use their "Polymerized Tung Oil" on food-contact items and recommends their "Pure Tung Oil" instead.
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Walnut Oil is also a good food-safe product. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p 056&cat=1,190,42942 John T.
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On 16/10/2015 5:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.com wrote:

A friend, a professional woodworker and highly skilled turner, tried that and had to refinish the bowl as it went rancid. I know it's not supposed to happen, but it did. Graham
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Yep - the "drying time" is ~ weeks - and it should properly have air & sunlight .. .. food-items sometimes go into a dark drawer or cupboard .. John T.
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On 16/10/2015 2:47 PM, G. Ross wrote:

I have used their pure tung oil, which takes ages to cure. If you don't cure it completely, I understand that you get the "trots" if you ingest the uncured oil. I think that the Polymerised Tung Oil contains metallic driers, something you don't want anywhere near your food. Graham
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Check antique catalogues see what they used for salad bowls. Garlic oil from a clove adds a nice flavor.
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On 10/18/2015 2:46 AM, OFWW wrote:

Generally nothing vegetable related as they go rancid. Garlic clove would fall under that category.
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Jeff

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