Has anyone tried using EMT with pipe clamps?

Was just thinking, EMT is so much lighter, so why nor use Pipe to EMT adapters and go for it?
Has anyone tried it?
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On 5/29/18 10:23 PM, OFWW wrote:

My guess is it would be too flexible because it's so thin. It seems to be getting thinner and thinner, too. Anyone see how thin copper pipe is these days? You can practically put your fingernail through it.
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wrote:

Yeah, the so-called water grade is pure crap. Even looking at a roll of it will cause dents and the tubing to get out of round. Shudder my first memories of picking some up at the local box store instead of my normal supply house and getting that by mistake.
EMT seems about the same, I suppose because steel is a lot less expensive. I think I'll try a short piece first because of the sliding locking clamp and see what happens when it grips the EMT and if it will cave it in or dent it.
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On 5/29/18 11:41 PM, OFWW wrote:

I wasn't thinking about the clamps caving in or denting the steel, although that is a possibility. I was thinking about the pipe bowing in the middle like cheap bar clamps do. It would cause the jaw faces to splay out and could cause poor/lost grip on the stuff being clamped.
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wrote:

I've had that problem with any pipe clamps. I threw them all away and bought Besseys. No problems with them.
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wrote:

Roll copper has ALWAYS been soft because it is annealed copper. Hard straight copper is what is "generally" used for water plumbing - M has always been thin. M is now stocked as "standard" at the Borg and other big box centers, L is still available and is "standard" at a good plumbing supply - where the cheaper lighter M is also available.

There are standards - which have not changed.
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wrote:

'L' copper is available at the BORG, too. It costs about 50% more than type 'M' but it is available. I use it for compressed air.

Like the size of a 2x4? ;-)
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wrote:

That just depends which grade you buy. L is still L, K is still K and M is still M. L is the "standard good" pipe, and M is the crappy cheap stuff that no self respecting plumber would have used 40 years ago.
K is the heavy stuff.
Now FITTINGS, I will agree. Used to be K or L weight copper, now much of it appears to be the thickness of M, if that.
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I have not tried it, but I have seen 1/2" black iron pipe bend as the clamps were tightened. I've also played a lot with EMT on the backyard ice rink, and can tell you the 3/4" EMT is probably as flexible as the 1/2 black iron.
It's also a lot cheaper too.
Let us know if you try it and it works.
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wrote:

I think I have some short pieces out in the garage, I'll give it a test to see. But yeah, running conduit shows it as flexible, maybe short pieces will react differently?
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On 5/29/18 10:44 PM, OFWW wrote:

I had thought about something similar one time.
Use short stubs of black pipe with the clamps. Install "T"'s on the threaded ends, then street elbows to EMT or other pipe so the system will extend along both sides of a panel glueup. This should eliminate any pipe bowing, assembly issues aside 8^)
-BR
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On 5/29/2018 8:23 PM, OFWW wrote: > Was just thinking, EMT is so much lighter, so why nor use Pipe to EMT > adapters and go for it? > > Has anyone tried it? >
EMT is way to light. I can handily bend 3/4 over my knee without hurting my knee.
IMC might be a viable alternative, but I have not really compared strength and price to rigid.
Also, I do not know how the OD for each compares. I don't know if your pipe clamps would go on easily or not. Need to wander over to the box store and find out I guess.
EMT is likely cheapest at the box store, but for rigid or IMC it might pay to check pricing at your local electrical suppliers. Especially if you are buying half a dozen pieces.
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My first thought is that if this worked, we'd all have known about it by now, and everybody would be doing it.

Not me, and I don't think it's going to work. Here's why:
1) I think it's *too* light, and is going to flex so much under clamping pressure that the clamp jaws won't even be close to parallel (that is, assuming it doesn't just buckle). EMT is called "thinwall" for a reason: wall thicknesses are 0.042" and 0.049" for 1/2" and 3/4" respectively. The corresponding dimensions for Schedule 40 steel pipe are 0.109" and 0.113". EMT is very easy to bend by hand; bending pipe or rigid conduit requires hydraulics.
2) I may be mistaken, but I don't think you're going to find the kind of adapter you need. Rigid electrical conduit is the same size as water pipe, with the same size threads -- but the only EMT-to-rigid adapters I've ever seen have female threads, probably because rigid has male threads on each end. Sure, you can add a pipe nipple too, but now you're starting to move into Rube Goldberg territory...
3) Even if you can manage to somehow adapt the clamp headstock to the EMT, I very much doubt that the tailstock will grip it tightly enough for clamping, because the tailstocks are sized for pipe and EMT is noticeably smaller: actual outside diameters are 1/2" EMT, 0.706"; 1/2" pipe, 0.840; 3/4" EMT, 0.922; 3/4" pipe, 1.050 -- and 1" EMT (1.163") is >10% larger than 3/4" pipe.
4) If you *do* manage both 2) and 3), I think that once you start tightening the clamps, the gripping mechanism in the tailstock will crush the EMT. Like I said, it's called "thinwall" for a reason.
If you decide to try it anyway, though, best of luck, and let us know how it turns out.
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On Wednesday, May 30, 2018 at 2:58:19 PM UTC-5, Doug Miller wrote:

ing the clamps, the

called "thinwall" for a

I doubt the gripping rings on the tail end of the pipe clamps will grip the EMT. The gripping rings are chromed steel. The EMT is chromed or some ki nd of gray plating. Its slick. I don't think the rings will grip the slic k EMT pipe. So no clamping force. I don't think it will grip enough to ev en dent the thinwall EMT. It'll just slip.
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On Wed, 30 May 2018 13:23:47 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

EMT is NOT chromed, it is electro-zinc plated.
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On Wednesday, May 30, 2018 at 4:32:43 PM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:

the EMT. The gripping rings are chromed steel. The EMT is chromed or some kind of gray plating. Its slick. I don't think the rings will grip the s lick EMT pipe. So no clamping force. I don't think it will grip enough to even dent the thinwall EMT. It'll just slip.

OK. But my point is still valid. I don't think the grip rings will work o n the electro zinc plated coating. Too slippery.
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On Thu, 31 May 2018 14:05:29 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

They work fine on clamps that come with electrozinc plated "pipes" from the factory. If the tube is the right size they will hold - but EMT is not the same size as pipe, and is too flimsy -0 the grip plates will deform the tube.
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gripping rings are chromed steel. The EMT is chromed or some kind of gray plating. Its slick. I don't think the rings will grip the slick EMT pipe. So no clamping force. I don't think it will grip enough to even dent the thinwall EMT. It'll just slip.

coating. Too slippery.

Perhaps for some definitions of "just fine'. I haven't had good experiences using pipe clamps with galvanized pipe.
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On Wed, 30 May 2018 19:58:16 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

If your aim is to make a cheap flexible useless clamp, just go buy a cheap chinese one and save the trouble???? <BG>
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wrote:

LOL, I have American made newer F clamps that are mighty weak. :) It is surprising that many don't publish the max clamping ft/lbs.
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