Toolless cord.

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You are a genius. And, to take that far-out thinking a step further, what if somehow, (I know I'm really reaching here..) one could someday select the direction of rotation? Huh? Huh? How's THAT for speculation. We're talking front-cover of Popular Science here.
r
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Robatoy (in snipped-for-privacy@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com) said:
|| different lengths. |||| |||| I bet this would catch on with the right advertising. || ||| Wow... what a good idea. Hey... what about this idea: maybe make a ||| modular unit like that which can take more than one tool? ||| Work with me here, we're on to something. || || That's brilliant! So, you could have one of these cord || extenders, and just plug in whichever tool you wanted to use. || Fantastic! || || I was also wondering about having a sort of two-way device || attached to a tool, so that you could set it one way and make || the electricity go into the tool, and set it the other way, || and stop the elctricity. This way you wouldn't have || to remove the batteries when you wanted it to stop rotating. || What do you think? || || -- Andy | | You are a genius. And, to take that far-out thinking a step further, | what if somehow, (I know I'm really reaching here..) one could | someday select the direction of rotation? Huh? Huh? How's THAT for | speculation. We're talking front-cover of Popular Science here.
Hey! I got one of those at Harbor Freight for really cheap.
Even better, they had a steel box with a set of 115 zero-clearance drill inserts, with a free bit for each size. Problem is, I can't seem to get the !@#% inserts out without damaging the box...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Oh my! Have you tried an insert extractor?
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Now this tread is getting silly. With the engineering and tooling required to make a universal extender, it would be priced way too high and be too large to be practical. Next thing you know, some moron will try to use the extender with a lamp and damage the entire electrical grid. You're flirting with danger there.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

As you well know, the only way to damage the entire electrical grid is when you pull out an extender by the wire and not the connector. You could yank out quite a bit of grid fabric out of the wall when you do that. Nobody has ever done that yet.
Very dangerous indeed. A whole buch of electricals could leak out and form a puddle on the floor, and when you step in it......whoa boy...
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Well I know doing that sort of thing with my razor pretty much killed the batteries. It would have to be set up so that the ac/dc converter could supply enough juice to run the drill and charge the battery at the same time, not draw the current through the battery when charging.
-Leuf
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Heh.
Reminds me of the conversation with my wife regarding her desire to get a drill for her little pyrography/scroll saw shop. She was pretty sure she had to get a cordless one- a cheap one would do, of course. Anything cordless was fine in her book, even if it could barely drive a screw, and would only hold a charge for a minute and a half. A corded drill was absolutely out of the question, of course.
I still can't figure out her problem with the suggestion that she just get a good DeWalt corded drill for $50 instead- I even offered to buy it for her. The damn thing was never going to leave a 11' x 13' shop with outlets on every wall. It's amazing how the cordless idea has become so prevalent. They're great on a jobsite with no power, or for a quick job in the backyard- but why in the hell would a person need one inside the house when it's going to sit on one table at all times?
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I use both my cordless drills inside; one in the house and one in the Man Garage where the woodworking shop resides. Both places have power everywhere too, but it's a lot more convenient without the power cord, AND (this is critical) the cordless drills have torque level clutches, but none of the power-cord drills have them.
Which brings up a question: Does anyone make a corded drill with a clutch? I've never seen one, and I've looked . . . .
-Don
--
"What do *you* care what other people think?" --Arline Feynman

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No matter what size the shop, I find a cordless drill works better 95% of the time. You don't end up with tangled cords and having to find an outlet every time you need a drill. If you put the dead battery on the charger every time, there will be no issues with dead batteries.
I already have a cordless drill for use outdoors and such so the extra cost really isn't an issue.
Brian Elfert
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wrote:

All right, here's the problem in a nutshell-
She has problems with carpal tunnel, and cordless drills are heavier.
I already moved all the outlets up the wall, so that they are 4-6 inches above each table- and very easy to access.
And she didn't want to spend more than $50 new.
Add those things together, and I'd say it's a gem of a case for using a drill with a tail. If she needs a cordless drill for something, there's an 18v DeWalt in my shop that she's free to use any time.
A $50 corded drill is a good tool- a $50 cordless is junk.
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I've been known to stuck a hex-shank drill bit in a portable screwdriver (one of those straight stick kind) for drilling a simple hole from time to time. They do a pretty good job when you just need one or two small holes.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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