Tool stand stability


Hello all, Most tool stands that I've seen have splayed legs for more stability. I'd like to make one that has straight legs instead , but am concerned about stability since I will have my Performax 16-32 on the top, and my Dewalt dw735 planer on a lower shelf. That's a combined weight of about 200 lbs. Is there a specific ratio between height and width that will assure stabilty? I'm guessing a minimum of 2:1- so for a height of 36 inches it has to be at least 18 inches wide. Does that sound about right? Thanks for any help, Gene
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It's more a function of how the tool is loaded. Planers are loaded fore and aft, and would benefit from a bit of a wide footprint in those directions. Side to side is not meaningful. My planer stand is 30% deeper than the length of the table. Works well.
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Any way you can set something up that attaches to the ground? Something as simple as metal pipe with the screw down flanges on the bottom my suffice.
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Gene T says...

That configuration would be more stable than just having one tool on the top. There isn't going to be much force working to tip the stand under normal use since the machines feed automatically and long stock will have to be supported anyway so that you don't get snipe. I don't see a problem unless you get drunk and fall into it.
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I don't know if you are planning to make your stand mobile or not, but if it is, I would reccomend that you try to build some sort of flip down outrigger of some sort for more stability. Very similar to the part of this type on the Shop Fox mobile bases.
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wrote:

I built a tool stand for my little Delta TS, dimentions are 18.5" x 14.5" x 22.5", and it's steady as a rock. But, with an extra 14" of height, I'd want it to have a little larger footprint, or some wider material (I used 1.5" x 1.5" x .188" angle iron.)

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By stability, I assume you mean the ability not to tip over, as opposed to not sway in the breeze. You want the center of gravity as low as possible. The formula must include what is on the stand, not the stand alone. The CG should be no higher than the distance from center to edge. Splayed legs allow for a smaller table on top and saves material, but it is not necessarily any more stable than straight legs having the same dimension on top as the base footprint and the tool centered on it.
Extreme examples. Take a 15 pound grinder with a base of 8" x 8". Make a table that is 9" x 9" and it will easily tip over. The more you splay the legs, the more difficult it is to tip. Take your 200 pound planer and sit it in the center of your 30" x 72" work bench. You get the idea.
Splayed legs allow you to stand closer to the tool as you have room for your belly to hang over the base. OTOH, if there is too much splay, you tend to trip over the legs when you get closer and use the top surface as the visual reference as to where to stand.
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Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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IMHO, that depends on whether you're exerting side pressure... Also, if it has wheels, make it at least 40% wider at the bottom, or it will fall over when you move it.. DAMHIKT
mac
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wrote:

It also depends on how wide the top is to be. For a 1" shelf. 18" sounds reasonable. For anything wider, 1/2 the height + the width of the top would surely be more practical... ;]
- Andy
Pedant? Moi? No, I like my women a little older.
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wrote:

I might also add that the weight of the tool makes a difference... In my case, it was a 36" belt, 9" disc sander combo that was way too top heavy to not make a wider base when adding casters... sucker fell over the 2nd time I moved it.. lol
mac
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[---8<---]

That brings back memories of when I first started woodsmithing. (I'm only barely out of the "bludgeon it 'til it fits" stage) An old-timer was showing me around his workshop when I noticed an antique top-driven scroll-saw that I would've said was made back in the bronze-age except there was so much cast iron it showed up on geo-survey maps.
The base, a massive frame of 4x4's, stopped you from approaching anywhere near what I would call a safe or comfortable working distance...I remember wondering how he managed to see where he was cutting without binoculars!
- Andy
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Ahhhh...this phrase should be in my new collection of woodworking terms....
Andy McArdle wrote:

(I'm only barely out of the "bludgeon it 'til it fits" stage)
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