Tool Safety -what happens when you forget

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On Tue, 1 Feb 2011 21:14:35 -0800, "Edward Hennessey"

_Fountainhead_ is on my reading list and on my bookshelf. Loved _Atlas Shrugged_, to be sure.

Oh, I had responded only to "suture ants". Lessee, googling now... Found this tasty tidbit: --snip-- The fact that the term "ant farm" is covered by a trademark received notoriety when Scott Adams, the creator of the Dilbert comic strip, used the phrase in one of his comic strips. Upon using the term "ant farm", Adams subsequently received threatening letters from Uncle Milton industries' attorneys, demanding a retraction for the unauthorized use of the phrase "ant farm" in his comic strip.
In reaction to the legal threat, Adams satirized the incident in a later comic strip. In that strip, Dilbert asked for a substitute for the trademarked phrase "ant farm", looking for another word for "a habitat for worthless and disgusting little creatures." To which the character Dogbert replied "Law school." --snip--

Borden.
Once D.C. gets their wall built...nah, karma might be worse.

OuchOuchOuchOuchOuch. Like, MegaDittoes, dude.
Who is John Galt?
-- To the well-organized mind, death is but the next great adventure. -- J. K. Rowling
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wrote:

LJ:
Wow. If you can put your ants in suits, you can put a man on Venus....
SNIP

The thing is, they are honestly beautiful beyond the justice of photography. And hard workers? They short hop all day long.

I shrug my shoulders a lot lately...must be that danged Atlas vertebra kicking up again.
This was sent to me on Ayn Rand/Ann O'Connor recently: http://www.good.is/post/conservative-darling-ayn-rand-died-loving-government-handouts / I shrugged at that too. But you never know until you verify. If that's askew, it would be noteworthy. But off to the wheel.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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On Wed, 2 Feb 2011 08:51:52 -0800, "Edward Hennessey"

If you put on a suit, you'd have it over Uranus, or some such spelling.

Gorgeous! http://tinyurl.com/66kaw9l

Yeah, same here.

Cord is a libdick from HelL.A. What could he know? Note the tres chic (nah, sleazy) 2-day growth of beard. Well, at least he's posting something of inestimable value, like http://tinyurl.com/4ubvhvc

I found a gazillion liberal blogs spouting off about it, but nothing concrete showed up on Snopes or other such research site.
-- Woe be to him that reads but one book. -- George Herbert
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wrote: SNIP
LJ:

Well, he and the others are digging themselves a very deep dirt nap if there isn't meat in this one. I don't know when it broke. An advanced search with date restriction would tell. Given the obvious instinct of Rand afficionados to vindicate her from a slur and their industrious abilities, a convincing rebuttal equipped with factual citations should occur within a predictable time period.
I would be happy to boomerang that to my informant if he was pulling the trigger on an empty barrel. He's not a knee jerk. If reasonable people can agree on anything, it is that history says the price of principle in crucial moments is quite often the principle of price. Either way, fair is fair, it would be nice to see where this goes to root.
Responsive to_content_in the URL above--Tweety tweets and owls are wise for silence.
You might enjoy a book I read moons ago "The Nobility of Failure: Tragic Heroes in the History of Japan". It's available; sincerity readable.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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wrote:

The night guy at the local 7-11.
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That's simply because the pharmaceutical crowd couldn't make any money on it hence they don't pay the FDA to approve it.

It works well. Heals much faster than it would on it's own. Human saliva works just about as well. Over the years, I have been cut up quite a lot at work from sharp metal, stationary cutters, etc. Generally, I just wrap a rag around it until it quits bleeding and continue on. I have, on occasion, been cut near to the bone. In that case, a piece of gauze and some tape do the trick.
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<snipped>
While the gut is the largest immune organ in the body, the mouth is an extension that is generally "cleaner" than the rest. There are plenty of immune cells in saliva (especially if you have gingivitis). Some of these immune cells, such as the PMN or neutrophils can generate nice amounts of hydrogen peroxide (via myeloperoxidase), with which they can kill microbes. Actually, the PMN pin the microbes against a wall, then secrete all kinds of antimicrobial stuff into the hollow formed in that way (phagocytic vacuole).
Letting a wound bleed a little is good too (lick it up so as not to waste the good stuff!). Then apply pressure to give the platelets a chance to stop bleeding and keep it that way for a clot to form. Keep the closing wound moist with a cream (triple antibiotic is good) and don't wash the good stuff away. If too big (judgement call) and certainly if it becomes inflamed (red, swollen, hurting), get yourself to a doctor.
--
Best regards
Han
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

I gotta get some of those--would have saved me 2000 bucks a while back.
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Steve:
Reboot addendum. Don't get the hand in water for about 10 days or so. Other hand cleaners will work for the area aside from the wound. Put a plastic bag over your hand when you bathe or shower, taping or rubber banding the bag closed at the wrist.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Edward Hennessey wrote:

--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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I would like to thank the group for a number of very good and some humerous suggestions. I elected to heed some of the advice and moved up an appointment that I had for this coming Friday to yesterday. After getting an earfull of how I should have come in right away and upon a fast look, he was pleasantly surprised at what he saw. I had picked up a number of items at a local drug store on the way home, and redressed when I finally arrived home. Fighting the urge to let my dog lick it clean :) I cleaned it myself, removed some dead skin and other materials, I used some off the shelf healing ointment (whose name excapes me at the moment) applied two butterfly banages not to close the gap but to keep the sides from excess movement and thus reopening, applied some gauze and taped. I have been changing this dressing several times a day and as the doctor recommended, open it to the air in the evening when there is little to no activity. It seems to be right on track in the healing process as it seemed to have filled it in the depth of the initial cut nearly 2/3 leaving a scant 1/8 inch deep. The doctor gave me a script for some antibiotics, and there seems to be no swelling or discoloration of the area, so I think I dodged a bullet.
Unfortunatly, it seems that life without the use of the thumb is nearly impossible, but I did manage to get some glue-ups done on the legs of the table (anyone every try and tighten a clamp using just the fingers?) and I now have two of them done. I might actually have this done by the time the wife gets back from Arizona visiting daughter. News of this event will have to wait, as the last time she left I managed to nail my hand to a ceiling joist while making a tray ceiling in the dining room during her last trip but that is another story entirely.
Suffice to say, that I am on the mend and than everyone for their well wishes and soon I hope to be more engaged in the shop and I have several projects waiting to be completed and some more renovation projects that need to be completed before her return.
SteveA
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Steve...? It sound like you heal quickly, but, please, don't make a habit of it, okay?
The mental picture of you nailed to a ceiling elicited a chortle.
Glad to hear you're on the mend.
R
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Hey Steve. Thank God that it was a minor injury and you're still in one piece. I hope you heal up right quick. Thanks for posting - we all need a reality check once in a while.
take care
R
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SteveA wrote: <snip>

Ouch! :(

Thanks for posting. What everybody got was a reminder to be careful. Always vigilant. Plus some excellent medical info.
--

dadiOH
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SteveA wrote: <snip>

Ouch! :(

Thanks for posting. What everybody got was a reminder to be careful. Always vigilant. Plus some excellent medical info.
--

dadiOH
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Ahhhhh been there done that. Glad to see you are up to posting your experience.
And thanks for pointing out that you are a safety instructor for this type work, and that you are still clueless how this all happened.
It is extremely hard to understand how your knowledge of the tool and knowledge of all the safety rules is not a guarantee to keep you safe. Until it happens to you, you really have no idea how fast and unexpedily an accident can happen.
It tool me 1 year to understand how I cut half my thumb off, I almost did it again. That was 20 years ago after woodworking seriousely the previous 10 years. Adding one more safety rule to my list has kept me unharmed for the last 20 however I know that later today I could loose a hand. It is called an accident for a reason.
BTY, the size of the machine does not increase the likelyhood or severity of the damage that can be done.
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I lost part of the tip of my left middle finger from a biscuit joiner of all things. Shit happens. No one is immune.
R
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Thanks for sharing your story with us. Safety is certainly a consideration that every woodworker must keep in mind at all times. I believe your Powermatic 3000 is clearly too dangerous a tool for you to continue using. Buy the sawstop as soon as possible. If you are within a few hundered miles of Baltimore please email me and I will remove the PM3000 from your shop at no cost within a few days.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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Steve,
Two questions:
1) Guard, no guard?
2) You're the safety guy, but have you ever taken a class in tablesaw safety? You're injury might serve as a warning to the others in your shop.
3) Push sticks.
4) My friend, who is an excellent teacher/woodworker, would always say in each of his classes every day - know the danger zones of your equipment.
5) Healthy respect for your equipment, is a good thing! But it should never stop you from using it.
Take care. I'd see a doctor myself for your finger, but that's up to you.
Michael
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Your post grabbed my attention because parts of it remind me very much of what I did about 10 years ago. Except the pain part. Mine hurt!
I was making a handful of small identical parts to use as spacers in a project. These are the kind of small parts that can gather up beyond the blade as you feed one after another through the saw. When I finished, I turned the saw off, gathered the small parts and started to walk away. For some reason, I looked back and saw one piece still on the table just past the blade. I reached over to pick it up and heard and felt "tink, tink, tink, tink." The blade was still spinning and caught the pointer finger of my right hand, lacerating it to the bone. My wound too took some time to start bleeding but when it did, blood flowed freely. holding my finger tight, I managed to get into the house and grabbed a towel from the front of the kitchen. By then, my wife heard the commotion, and rushed to the kitchen to see an already soaked red towel.
Long story short, it removed much of the end of the finger and nicked the bone, requiring a round of antibiotics. I ran around with a splint to protect my finger for a week or so; a constant reason to have to explain my stupidity to every one who asked. That was ten years ago and the finger still has a thick, callous-like scar that is sensitive to cold. The thing that bugs me most about the incident was what I did about a week prior to the accident. I actually had the audacity to tell my wife "You know, I have been lucky. I have been woodworking for more than 25 years and have not had an injury". On thinking back this reflected a bit of arrogance that I paid for.
Since then I have developed a habit of looking directly at the blade, or cutter head from the time the stock enters the cutting zone until the blade STOP TURNING. Once the operation is finished, I do nothing until that blade or cutter stops moving, Of course I have to look down to turn off switches, etc, but my attention is on the blade until it stops.
RonB
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