Timber Health Hazards

Or, health hazards & wood. http://www.ubeaut.com.au/badwood.htm
Just ran across this in a batch of files I was discarding. This ties in with the recent cutting board thread. Don't know if any is claimed to be lethal, but some of it is definitely pretty nasty, and I would think that lack of medical attention in some cases could result in death. Or, you could call it filtering the gene pool.
JOAT When in doubt, go to sleep. - Mully Small
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J T wrote:

http://darwinawards.com/darwin/darwin1999-50.html
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Nothing really "new" in the list, I've seen one from the USFS showing similar statements. Ralph's woodworking rule #2 states, There are two types of woodworkers, those that are allergic to wood dust, and those that will be.
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On Thu, 22 Feb 2007 05:37:49 -0800, Ralph E Lindberg

And allergy to wood dust does not automatically translate to allergy to solid wood, and even less to food that was cut on that solid wood, which is where all the hue and cry in the cutting board thread came from.
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Well, not necessarily. Byssinosis, a condition caused by exposure to cellulose (wood dust) does not address the real villain, the chemicals in the wood, which are the sensitizers. It is these, dissolved in what you cut on the board which represent a danger to both bacterial and mammalian cells. The larger critter has a number of resources available to fight back, the bacterium must rely on random resistance and the next generation.
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Wow. One of the most concise, matter of fact answer's I have ever seen in a Usenet post!
In research it seems, Byssinosis is more common to cotton workers in enclosed spaces, working with dust and fibres. It can be easily applicable to a wood working space as the finer particles can be easily inhaled, leading to many problems if the dust collection system ain't working.
I take deference to your idea that a simple cutting board is a real threat to anyone in the world if they give it a good wash off and a bit of a scrub. Never met anyone getting sick from using a cutting board, wood or plastic or butcher block.
Nice post though!
Phred
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