Thin cherry boards

I'm looking to make 2 or 3 small boxes out of cherry, about 10" by 10" by 12".
I have a bandsaw, and was thinking of resawing cherry. Or I can buy some thin stock.
Any recommendations? Is it a waste of my time to try to master resawing?
Any recommendations for 1/4" by 10" by 36" cherry stock?
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Bruce, I am making a scrollsawn clock from 1/4" cherry boards that I resawed from some 4/4 boards. I just recently got the G0555 from Grizz and a timberwolf blade, and had no problem resawing some 8-9" planks with it. (This was my first time resawing, and also my first time using a bandsaw at all). Just build yourself a 'point fence'. Since you will (I assume) plane them after resawing, you don't have to be a master at resawing to get some decent boards. 2 1/4" boards from a 4/4 board leaves some decent wiggle room.
-Rob
Bruce Barnett wrote:

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On 30 Dec 2004 16:30:22 GMT, Bruce Barnett

twice the material from the same board. resawing is not all that dificult. also the pieces will be bookmatched making the project look better IMO.

if you buy 5/4 stock and go slowly you can get 3 finnished 1/4 pieces from one board.
skeez
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+ snipped-for-privacy@grymoire.com says...

Learning a new skill which will likely come in handy at other times hardly seems to be wasting time
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I just posted pix of a cherry jewelry box I made for my daughter on abpw... I bought 4/4 stock and resawed, then planed it to 3/8.
djb
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Thanks, Rob, skeezics, Mike G and Dave Balderstone.
And others. I don't have a planer, but I'm pretty good with a belt sander. I'll give resawing a try...
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Check your yellow pages. There's a shop here that will let you play with their stuff for about $30 CDN an hour...
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But that was this morning. Now you have god reason to buy one!
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Grin. That was one of the reasons I asked about re-sawing vs. buying thin stock.
What do you call someone who spends $800 to save $10 on materials?
.......................... A woodworker.
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On 31 Dec 2004 02:49:59 GMT, Bruce Barnett

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cherry than you will for 'craft wood'.
I could go through the whole economic argument as to why you _need_ a planer, but, although I know where the chalk is, there's no easily available chalkboard.
Of course, if you were to drop by one of the many recent handplane threads, you could likely talk yourself into spending a lot more on handplanes, too.
Aren't we helpful? ;-)
Patriarch
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On 30 Dec 2004 16:30:22 GMT, Bruce Barnett

I take it that you have either a large bandsaw or a riser on a smaller one? Good.
Make the boards yourself. Learning how to resaw doesn't take much time at all. Some tips:
1) Build a tall fence which is perfectly vertical. (Hint: if you cut triangular boards, the fence isn't quite vertical.) Verify with a pair of calipers. 2) Practice on SCRAPS first. 3) Draw a line down the edge of a piece of wood you want to resaw and cut freehand (without the fence) about halfway down the length of the board. This will show you the blade angle. Draw a line on the table with a pencil to remember the angle. 4) Set the fence to this angle. Now you can slab wood! 5) Use a featherboard to keep the wood against the fence and pay attention while you cut. 6) Don't try to make paper-thin veneer like the crap on the market. It's hell to work with and totally unforgiving for mistakes, especially for miters and sanding. 3/32 or 1/8" is my aim. 7) Keep the area in front of the bandsaw dust-free. You don't want to slip into 10 inches of exposed, spinning bandsaw blade. It'll take an arm off in about half a second. Dust collectors help. 8) If you don't own one, wish that you had a drum sander to finish the slabs.
Have fun!
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Thanks, Larry. Looks like good advice.
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Bruce Barnett wrote:

Definitely resaw. It's not difficult to learn to resaw at all.
The big benefit to resawing is in grain matching on the box sides. If you plan the resaw correctly, you can end up with two sides that are continuous with grain around two corners, and bookmatched at the other two corners.
To do it, you joint one side of some 4/4 stock. Resaw the stock in half. Plane to thickness. Crosscut the boards like this:
--------------------------------------------- | | | | Front | Rt side | | | | ---------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------- | | | | Lft side | Back | | | | ---------------------------------------------
Hope that helps.
Nate
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Ah. Yes. That will look much nicer. Thanks, Nate.
This brings up another problem I haven't solved.
There will be two "doors" on either end. (It's a long story to explain why, and off-topic). Both open out. But if I match the grain around the sides, I have to cut a square hole in the middle of each 10" by 10" board. And then I don't think I can have the doors with matching grain.
Either the ends are made from one piece of wood (I have to cut a square 8" by 8" hole in a 10" by 10" board), or from pieces (miter 4 1" wide pieces together.) This is 1/4" thick wood.
Problems with one piece:
If I try to cut out a square piece, I'll have the waste of the saw kerf. I'm not sure how to attempt this. I do have a 1940 Walker Turner scroll saw.
Problems with four pieces of wood:
I suppose I can glue the ends I miter together. Making splines in 1/4" stock would be hard.
I was going to try the 4 piece method, unless someone has a better idea. So there goes the bookmatch advantage. :-(
Hmm. I suppose I could cut the ends like a bandsaw box, and re-glue it. Cut two pieces horizontally, then take the middle, and cut two pieces vertically. But then the ends will no longer be perfectly bookmatched.
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My wife is telling me it's time to go over to her mother's house, so I'll keep this brief, and you can ask some more questions later, if you haven't figured it out already...
One method of making box lids grain match involves cutting the lid off of a closed box with a very sharp, thin kerf saw blade. I use a table saw, but others, whose bandsaws are better tuned than mine, claim they can do it with theirs. If you were to build your box, and then slice _two_ lids off, the resulting glue lines, in most woods, would be _almost_ imperceptible, in all but the most figured woods. While the box is apart, you could cut your door openings, carefully, and then reglue, trimming your doors for height as needed.
And if you were to plan your bookmatch carefully, who knows?
This method is also used for matching a drawer front in a table, such as a hall table or huntboard.
Gotta go! Have fun!
Patriarch
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writes:

I'm not sure that I completely understand what you mean ... but it sounds like you could cut them to bookmatch and then use your scrollsaw to cut the doors. With a fine scrollsaw blade the kerf will be minimal. You could even tilt the table on your scrollsaw slightly as you do the cut so that no airgap would be visible (e.g., as is done with scrollsawn marquetry).
Also, for thin mitered joints you might want to consider a tablesawn key as a reinforcement.
Sounds like a fun project. Good luck!
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