The True Position Drill Guide

Ok, a follow up on this jig that I bought a few weeks ago. I finally got to use this jig in the lone boring capacity to bore shelf pin holes. Unlike the Rockler jig that uses the spring loaded "Vix" style drill bit this accessory add on to the main jig uses a standard drill bit and or brad point bit, and I bought the 5mm vs. the 1/4" version. The main jig is make to accurately position holes for drawer/door pulls and knobs. 1/4" holes would be too big for pulls and knobs. Anyway the two accessory line boring bars are 1/2" thick aluminum bars with hardened steel drill hole inserts. Being 1/2" thick pretty much insures that you are going to drill your holes perpendicular to the surface. With the Rockler and similar jigs the guides are about 1/8" thick and do not insure a "perpendicular to the surface hole". The drill bit can easily tilt. I might add that this was another reason I preferred the Kreg jig over the Rockler style jig although this was really never an issue, drilling a crooked hole, if you pay attention when indexing the drill bit. The True Position line boring guides come in a set of two bars and each allows drilling 12 holes, both attached to the main jig allow up to 25 holes spaced 32mm apart. On my current project I did not have enough room or need more than 12 holes in the lower cabinet so I simply use one bar by itself. Using the Kreg jig in the same situation I would have had to position the jig "3" times for 12 evenly spaced holes. The Kreg allows 6 holes to start then one hole is used to index from the last hole and only allows drilling 5 holes from that point at each placement. While the Kreg jig does allow you to buy extra units to attach for a longer run, the attachment method uses the same type plastic used in the jig and the paired jigs do not sit flat. The paired jigs absolutely need to be clamped to the panel at their union to flatten the jig assembly out. this is problematic because as you remove the clamp the jig assembly wants to bow again and this binds with the indexing pin if you are drilling more than 12 holes. Further you have to flatten the jigs to be able to insert the indexing pin into a previously drilled hole. It is a good idea but made with the wrong type of material for ganging the jigs together.
So I drilled my 12 hole runs in 2 locations for a total of 8, 12 hole runs. I simply sat the jig on top of a 3" wide board to index at the starting location, drilled 12 holes and relocated to the new location. Each set of 12 holes took me approximately 70 seconds from indexing the jig and clamping it into position, so that I would hot have to hold it, and drilled my holes in the already assembled cabinet about 32mm behind the face frames. That was much much faster than had I been using the Kreg jig.
As I mentioned I opted for the 5mm sized holes and these do look a bit more elegant compared to the 1/4' holes that I have always used in the past.
Pricing for the True Position jig line boring "accessory", 2 bars, will set you back about $110. The Kreg is approximately $35 for the single 6 hole plastic jig which works very well when used alone but truly a lot of trouble and a waste of time when used singularly and you have several hundred holes to drill. I drilled 96 holes total in 8 locations on an assembled cabinet in about 10 minutes, first time out.
As a comparison of the True Position jig to the Kreg for the upper cabinets to the project, I will be drilling approximately 36 shelving positions. That will total 288 holes and the True Position jig used in its full capacity, both bars attached to the main jig, will need to be indexed 2 times for each run, the Kreg used by itself would require 7 separate indexing for each run.
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After those 23,495 lines of text, you didn't post a link to the guide? You forced me to have to go and look it up myself.
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On 9/12/2014 10:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

Sorry, I think I posted it in my original, this was a follow up. If you haven't found it ill provide a link.,
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On Friday, September 12, 2014 10:06:55 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

I am right there with you, fella. I can stand it when someone takes the ti me to put together a well thought out post based on their personal experien ce with it. Really, if they are going to freely share the results of their search for a certain tool, show the pricing of it, then review it for suita bility of use after testing it, then the least they can do is post a link. Maybe even generate a video, and put a link to that in their post as well.
I admire your zero effort approach, except that you kind of broke protocol by making a bit of effort when you asked to be spoon fed the rest of the in formation on the jig. Calm back down and go back to sleep.
Robert
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On 9/12/2014 12:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

;~)
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Actually, I did look it up already (remember me mentioning the Woodpecker jig?). It was just me trying to be funny (although many can attest that I don't always succeed). :)
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On 9/12/2014 3:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

;!)
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