The tradeoff between 110 vs 220 - please explain

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... and exactly what I said... the voltage drop is proportional to the current flowing in the conductor.
The drop is twice for the same motor running at 110v/20A as for the 220V/10A. Again, the drop in the wire from the voltage source to the motor is V=I * R. Twice the current, twice the voltage drop. It really is that simple.

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Al Reid wrote:

Ok, then maybe i'm missing smoething or you were disagreeing with the wrong person because I don't disagree with you...
--
gabriel

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The thing I was taking issue with is the statement that "In other words, a 10A 220V cable will have two hot wires, each of 10A 110V" Which is not really correct. If you had a neutral and were using a device that references the neutral, then your statement is correct. However, in the context of a 220 v service, there is a 220 v potential across the two hots, not 2 sources of 110V. I was just trying to be sure that anyone else looking at this thread does not get the wrong impression.
Ok. Truce. ;^}

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them. Everything works properly; eventhough it is a 240v circuit.
Then you attach a neutral in between them. No current flows down the neutral since the circuit is balanced, the lights don't change brightness; everything is precisely the same as without the neutral. Everything works properly; eventhough it is now a multiwire 120v circuit.
So, what does the neutral do? Nothing at all. There is 1.2a running through each bulb with or without the neutral. So what is the wrong impression?!
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You picked a balanced condition. Just one of many posibilities. Do the same with a 100w and a 60 w. The neutral will cary the imbalance. In fact, if you measured carefully, you would find that in your scenario, that there was a small current in the neutral. In the case of a 220v motor, which was being discussed, there is no center tap. The windings are wired in series for 220 and in parallel for 110. So what. In the absence of a neutral, you have a 220v single phase feed. Period. You can try to call it two 110v feeds, but you would be wrong. Add a neutral and you would then be correct.
There are so many misleading answers to electrical questions that it is best to be precise and correct when providing information. Just because "you could say that" does not make it technically correct.

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Al Reid wrote:

As you stated. Two 110/120 legs is a common misconception, as is the misconception that everything always has to be referenced to a grounded conductor, or that there is something sacred about center-tapped transformer configurations.
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The voltage drop is one half, but it is figured into twice the voltage; so the % drop is one quarter.
Since the actual voltage drop is irrelevant I was a tad sloppy; sorry.
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You are correct, as stated in % voltage drop.

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,,and misinformation. your voltage drop calcs are wrong.

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I find it funny that you would criticize people for lack of information and immediately follow it with wrong information! What I think you are referring to is that there will be one quarter less power wasted due to wiring resistances. P = VI I = V/R, V = IR therefore, the power lost in wiring due to resistance in the wire is P=I^2R. When the current is cut by a factor of 2, the power lost is cut by a factor of 2 squared, or 4.
Frank
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You are right, it is downright hilarious! I left out "%" because it was implied. Shoot me.
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Go with 220 when you can. Machines will run cooler and more efficiently
John

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