The quest for a perfect miter joint

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Leon wrote:

That would depend solely upon how uniformly the stock is fed.
--

dadiOH
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Yeah, you're right.
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Undercutting isn't necessarily a bad thing, such as when you're trimming an old out-of flat window case.
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On Fri, 02 May 2008 21:06:29 +0000, Scott Lurndal wrote:

I think he would be better of improving the finish of the cuts with a good blade vs working on a system to finish the cuts.
I had a combination Craftsman (unknown model came with the saw and the bulk of the print was worn off) that gave cross cuts a polished glass finish. This is he wants in the first place, might as well start with it.
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wrote:

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Dick Snyder wrote:

http://www.lionmitertrimmer.com /
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Bill B.

http://home.comcast.net/~bberg100
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miter
like
This situation screams for the use of a bench plane and shooting board. There is a clip in the subscription section of the FWW site and there are tons of other references on the web and in books and magazines...
The upside of using a shooting board over something like a Lion Trimmer is the bench place can be used for myriad other tasks.
John
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/subscription/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id0677
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Dick, the problem with sanding or trimming a miter cut after cutting to length on a saw is that it ends up being too short. If you sand, you have to determine how much to over cut and how much to sand off, it's a crap shoot at best unless you have a stop to sand to a particular distance.
I suggest a Dubby Miter Sled or the new Rockler Sled.
http://in-lineindustries.com / or http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 063
To cut a clean miter you need a sharp and a good quality regular width kerf blade. The Forrest WWII works well for this purpose. You also need to be certain that opposite parallel pieces are precisely the same length or they will never fit together tightly regardless if you are cutting dead on 45 or not. Because the pieces have to be precisely the correct "LENGTH" sanding will almost always change the length of the piece of wood.
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Leon wrote:

Just a comment, It does not matter how close to perfection the miter cut is, if the opposite sides of the frame are not absolutely the same length the miter is not perfect.
--
Keith Nuttle
3110 Marquette Court
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I've found the best method for me is to glue up two joints 180 degrees from each other then trim as needed after the glue dries to get the last two joints the best you can get then glue them and move on. We woodworkers inspect things on a level that won't be viewed after the painting and glass goes in!
YMMV, Rich
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will
This is another place where the shooting board is handy... if pieces aren't exactly the same length, or not perfectly straight, the miters can be adjusted by using paper shims to adjust the position of the stock on the shooting board.
I posted a couple photos of cutting and shooting miters on ABPW that show how a shooting board would be used for this purpose.
John
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wrote:

80T crosscut blade. Even my 50T Freud Diablo will give me glue-ready joints straight off the table saw.
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Hi guys,
Thanks for your thoughtful replies as always. This group is the BEST.
Based on your replies I have decided to buy a better blade for my SCMS (I will order it today) - I am getting the Forrest Chopmaster as I have had such great results with the Forrest Woodworker II on my table saw. I am also going to make a sled with a stop block based on the picture I saw on Karl's website. This will give me a couple of choices for how to do my work in the future. I will finish my current project with the new blade. I have some other stuff to do while I wait for the Forrest blade to show up.
Dick
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Dick Snyder wrote:

I have found that I can get exact lengths on the opposite sides by fastening the opposite sides together and trimming both ends.
I uses a triangle miter gauge for the cuts and a staple gun to fasten the opposite sides together. I cut one end of the two sides, reverse the triangle miter gauge on the table and cut the other end.
In essences the you are cutting the miters on both sides of the square.
--
Keith Nuttle
3110 Marquette Court
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Keith,
I have never heard of a triangle miter gauge. Do you mean a miter gauge set to 45 degrees where you cut one side of the pair and then the other?
Dick
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