The Opposite Of UHMW?

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wrote:

Damn! I paid like $12. That hurts.
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[snip]
What came to my mind is the rubber anti-slip peel-and-stick thingies you can put on the bottom of your bath tub. Depends on if you need complete, continuous coverage on the bottom or not. Also, if you find the material that you want but it is not peel-and-stick, IME there is a simple contact spray adhesive that will solve that problem. Even regular ol' rubber cement can work -- just use it like laminate adhesive (coat both sides, let dry, press together). FWIW -- Igor
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igor:

That's an idea, but does it come in Delta gray?
UA100
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In my tub they do. But I think I bought them in white. I could send them to you.
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Think drafting board covering. Any graphic arts store should have it. I don't think it comes with adhesive backing though, I always put it down with double sided tape.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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Pounds on Wood wrote:

That's Borco. I know Borco. Believe me on this. The green side is forever burnt into my memory.
It's not sticky enough.
UA100, who try as he might could never get the curl out of Borco...
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aka Vyco. I lucked out at an architect's garage sale, and scored a humungous student table covered in Vyco, with Universal Boardmaster machine, plan drawer, pencil drawer, and gin-u-wine post-WWII massive construction, for $50. I couldn't fit it in my car, so he delivered it. And he threw in a 4'x2' light table with a parallel arm.
</driveby>

Not really sticky at all. Not slick, but hardly high-friction.
Kevin
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If you take all that stuff off the top, it would make a good table for your PC with CAD program.
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I've used some non-slip pads like the kind that are sold for cabinets or under carpets (The latter are pretty much the same as the "router pads" sold for about 3X as much per sq ft). Glue them on the bottom of your jig with some 3M 77 or use carpet tape.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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@wi.rr.com says...

It's called carpet tape. Get the kind with the plastic mesh embedded in it.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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"Unisaw A100" writes:

<snip>
Is there some reason you have rejected double sided tape?
Lew
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How about one of those non-slip Router pads??
John
On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 18:43:31 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

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Yes. I need to move the jig off the work top for storage and re-position it for use at a later time/date. With double stick/two-sided/carpet tape half the time the tape sticks to one side or the other. I just need it to stick to the jig and not slide about the work top when moderate pressure is applied laterally.
In other words, the opposite of UHMW.
UA100
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wrote:

You bemember dat red rubber gasket mateterial, Spanky?
I'd beese double face tapin' it onna bottom of da jig.
Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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You might try some of the thin, rubbery material reataurants and bars use to line their glassware shelves. Here is an example of a similar product: http://www.tapplastics.com/shop/product.php?pid%0 But you can probably obtain it from your local restaurant supply store. Your friendly neighborhood innkeeper might even have some spare pieces he would give you.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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Put double sided tape on one side of the grip tape used to build out the thickness of tennis racquet handles. Its made to be ... well ... grippy. Joe

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wrote:

high voltage electrical tape.
or a glob of silicone rubber on each foot. let it dry before you turn it back right side up.
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My idea would be to get a sheet of LDPE a little bit larger than the base of your jig. Scruff up the bottom of your jig with some rough sand paper and then smear some silicone caulk (not the paintable kind, but the pure kind.) all over the base of the jig and place it on the LDPE sheet. The silicone will not stick to the LDPE so when the silicone has cured, peel off the LDPE and you have a nice rubbery base for your jig.
I just bought a tube of the silicone at the Home Depot tonight. It was a tad under $5 for a standard calking gun tube, and available in about 5 colors.
If you cant find a sheet of LDPE this is the stuff coffee can lids are made from or lots of other stuff also. Visqueen and trash bags are also a candidate but if you use a film try and find the thickest one you can find as it will be easier to hold it flat as you set the jig on top. If you have to resort to a thin trash can liner, try stretching it over a board to restrain it.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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wrote:

Look for foamy plastic drawer liner or shelf "paper" at *-Mart.
It's about $6 for a big roll. I use it for sanding, routing, etc... A LIGHT misting of water will make it a bit tacky. The stuff comes in 4-5 colors and also works well lining tool drawers, and a much lower price than "rollaway drawer liner"!
Barry
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How big an area do you need to cover? It has been suggested - the super high friction tape from Lee Valley
I use it a few jigs and recently put it on the face of my biscuit cutter - works great
Another suggestion is to take a section of old bike tire tube and contact cement it on the jig. ... but I don't think it will hold as well as the tape.
Let us know what you have try and what you end up with.
Matt

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