The Critter Spray Gun - what it can/can not shoot

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I forgot to ask:
Which Bulls Eye sealer ???
http://www.zinsser.com/subcat.asp?CategoryID=1
or do you mean "SealCoat"
http://www.zinsser.com/subcat.asp?CategoryID=3
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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I use BIN under all my cabinet rehabs and finishing that have opaque (paint, high resin enamels, etc.) coatings as a final finish. It is shellac based with zinc oxide added for stain blocking and color bleed control. It works like a champ for recoats and color changes in all opaque finishes. It also makes a dandy sanding sealer.
Since it is white, I tend to use it like this: Sand your project to the desired grit. If you apply the white sealer on the sanded project, under a light you will see every single defect with ease when you sand. You can then sand them off, and recoat with the sealer. Depending on your feathering technique when spot touching, you will only have to reseal the spots you sanded.

Use seal coat under clear or translucent finishes as for all intents and purposes in this discussion it is clear. In contrast to the BIN which sprays out white, this goes on clear and you can easily see the grain of the wood under it after application. It is a good sealer and to me the best choice for clear or tinted lacquers, varnishes, shellacs, polys, etc.
Think about it this way:
Top coats of paint or other paint-like coatings that obscure the grain of wood: BIN.
Everything else: SealCoat.
As far as the colors of poly go, I can't say for sure. I know they used to have a Mahogany kind of finish at SW, as well as that gawdawful white pickled stuff. After that, unknown.
Don't be afraid of the Minwax. When properly applied, it works just fine. I know it doesn't bring out the inner craftsmen in the guys that are trying to connect to the ancient woodworkers of the past, but it works well.
You can try it on some scrap with your equipment, then if you don't like it, take it back to the store and get your money back. THAT is something you won't get at a SW, Benjamin Moore, etc. You buy it and open it, it's yours.
Robert
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Well, since you opened this can of worms, I might as well ask about "water based poly".
It occurs to me that it should be able to handle colors even better ???
I know that sounds a little too logical but finish chemistry ain't been my strong point, so I thought I would ask.
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I got nothin' on water based finishes. I know they are the future, but I figure that as long as I have to wear all the gear and take all the precautions I do when applying finishes, I will go with my favorites which are all solvent based..
I have almost no experience with water based finishes. I didn't like the look of the finishes, the cleanup, or the inability (on my part anyway) to fine tune to the exact spray characteristics of my guns. The experiences I had were not good, so went to other solvent based products to find a solution rather than pursuing a water based product.
I know that many professionals use the MLC brands water borne products (like BARRY when he is here), and others I have been in contact love the ML Cambell (sp?) brands. They swear by them.
At this time, not my cup of tea.
Robert
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Pat Barber wrote:

No direct experience; however, a fellow boat builder in CT tells me that water based finishes have come a long way in the last 5 years, and he is using them in marine applications.
Since this is an outdoor application, might want to take a look at Cetol which is used on teak trim on boats as an alternate to varnish.
Does provide an orange cast which may be objectionable.
Lew
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I'm gonna need a "colored" finish on these old deck chairs. They started out life as some sort of white and have been stripped and painted a time or two.
The last stripping was a couple of years ago and I just never got around to the finish. Some sort of colored finish is in my future.
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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"Pat Barber" wrote:

Do a Google on "Cetol", then take a trip to your nearest West Marine and pick up some data sheets.
My bet is if you had lunch in Oceanside and then walked the docks, you would find several Cetol boats in the slips.
Lew
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If you mean "OceanSide, CA.", I'm a pretty good distance from there.
I'm 3 blocks from the ocean in Myrtle Beach, S.C. and OceanSide has been the name of my business for 28 years.
I own two boats and I'm familar with Cetol, which is a fine product.
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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"Pat Barber" wrote:

For some reason I thought you were on the left coast.
Be rather a lengthy trip for lunch in Oceanside, CA.
Boats?
Did he say "Boats"?
What kind?
Lew
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Something interesting along the lines we have been talking about, but alas not for exterior applications but still very interesting...
http://www.zinsser.com/pdf/Decorating_Tinted_Shellac.pdf
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I've used it with oil-based primer and alkyd enamel to good effect. I thinned it just enough to shoot, to minimize runs on vertical surfaces. The self-leveling properties of the paint covered my technique. I was shooting interior "gates" with a lot of open work. Would use my el-cheapo HVLP if I had large surfaces to coat.
I've also used it with shellac. Makes me an even bigger fan of shellac.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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Thses look like they might fit the bill for me. Since I do mostly scroll saw and turning work, the smaller pattern would work well. I especially like the idea of being able to just swap mason jars. And this is way more in my budget and shop size ... lol. `Casper
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