Tablesaw tilt

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I was just wondering if anyone has an opinion on left or right tilt for their tablesaw. I notice a lot of saws come with right tilt only but have used left tilt for a while. Any opinions would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Lars
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Lars, This subject has been discussed numerous times recently. Do a Google Search and you'll find more than enough opinions. jlc

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stamp answer to.
Both saws will make all the same cuts. Some easier on the left tilt, some easier on the right tilt. Strictly personal preference. But if you need to be steered one way or the other,
Advantages:
Are you right handed?
Get the left tilt.
1. Left tilt has the bevel wheel on the right side and is easily turned with your Right hand.
2. Left tilt can rip a narrow bevel with out having to move the fence to the left side of the blade.
3. Left tilt allows the blade arbor nut to be removed with your right hand.
4. Left tilt allows your to remove the arbor nut and turn it in the direction that you would expect.
5. With a Left tilt, when both edges of a board are beveled, the sharp point of the bevel is up on the fence when cutting the second bevel as opposed to the bottom of the fence where it might slip under.
6. RIGHT tilt if you are left handed. The bevel wheel is on the left side of the saw.
7. RIGHT tilt if you "must" use the fence distance indicator when using a stacked dado blade set. The blades stack left, away from the fence. The indicator remains accurate. On the left tilt, the blades stack towards the fence and makes the indicator inaccurate. In this case use a tape measure to set the fence distance.
8. RIGHT tilt allows you to remove the arbor nut with your left hand but the nut must be turned clockwise to loosen. Bassackwards to normalcy.
If considering a cabinet saw, with wide 50" rip capacity.
The Left tilt will most often afford you the most storage room under the right table extension. The RIGHT tilt has an access door in that location that will demand room to open. The left tilt allows you to have access to the motor and or the insides of the cabinet from the more open left side of the saw with out having to crawl under the right extension table. Very nice if you ever happen to drop the arbor nut inside the cabinet. If you are considering getting a replacement saw and considering going to the opposite tilt this time consider that the miter slots may not be the same distance from the blade when comparing a left to right tilt saw. This may or may not be of concern but something to consider.
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On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 04:12:49 +0000, Leon wrote:

My right tilt Delta contractor saw (model 34-445C) has the bevel wheel on the right side.
<snip of other stuff that is correct and useful info>

<snip of other stuff that is correct and useful info>
--
Luigi
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Yeah, I need to add that there are occasional exceptions to the rule. LOL

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===============================My older (1990 or so) "right tilt"Jet Cabinet Saw also has the bevel adjustment on the right side of the saw... but who really cares...
In fact I can use the same statement (who really cares) to pick one over the other...
I own and use both... and I can not remember when I used one saw over the other because of which way the blade tilted...
The only cut I absolutely do only on the left tilt saw is a bevel rip using plywood ...this is because I can control any chip out on the "good" side of the plywood ...no other reason...
To be frank I do not make that kind of cut all that often..can't even remember the last time I made such a cut because i do not work with plywood very much....
My advice.... flip a coin ...I would not pay an additional penny for one over the other...
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On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 22:54:00 -0500, "Highspeed"

I think it's just a matter of what you are used to. I've used a right tilt for so long I couldn't really feel comfortable changing. If I had always used a left tilt I'd probably feel the same way....except backwards. :-)
I have noticed that a lot of higher end saws are available either way.
Mike O.
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Has any one heard of a motorized tilt unit to add to a table saw? I have a friend that has limited use of his right arm and has a hard time of adjusting the tilt of his saw.
--


Richard,

Richard L. Rombold
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wrote:

big commercial saws have them, but I've never seen one as an add-on. perhaps a power feed unit for a mill-drill could be adapted.
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Richard It is not difficult to do. I motorize enlarge focus and lift functions pretty easily. I use a Grainger gear motor running around 3 to 10 RPM and two timing belt pulleys and a timing belt. The control is a Kodak carousel projector remote control. You can build the whole thing for less than $100. I can supply more info if needed. max

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max wrote:

Another option, if you're electronicly inclined, would be a stepper motor and a cheap controller like a PIC with a couple of momentary switches to indicate direction. Check google for 'stepper motor controller cheap'. Stepper motors are used a lot in hobby robotics so that might be something to search on too.
Jeff
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Any way to either make an extension so he could use the other hand, or maybe a big-assed wheel/handle for his right?
mac
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IMHO it's just a matter of personal preference. I have a right-tilt saw and I can't think of anything it can do that a left-tilt can't.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 16:21:31 +0000, Lawrence Wasserman wrote:

I bet it can't tilt left.
- Doug
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To escape criticism--do nothing, say nothing, be nothing." (Elbert Hubbard)


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LOL!

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Oh yeah it will but if it is a heavy saw it will be harder to do. ;~)
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On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 09:34:48 -0700, Doug Winterburn

Depends on if you are standing in front of the saw or behind the saw... some people have different view points ....
Bob Griffiths
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Well, you got me there! :)
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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On Wed, 2 Feb 2005 22:54:00 -0500, "Highspeed"

Mine tilts left, away from the fence (as it should for better safety).
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If you search the archives of this group, you will find more than you care to read on this subject.

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