Tablesaw outfeed table

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I need to build a outfeed table for my tablesaw, what wood is recommended for the top surface? Would MDF work or what?
Thanks Michael
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Melamine or any other laminate is a good choice" slippery, easy to clean, cheap.
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Ditto, mine is melamine. Formica would be tougher, but the melamine has been in use for a year and a half and has only taken minor cosmetic damage. I'm not delicate with it.
I use it as an assemply and finishing space. I wax it every month or two, and glue/finish pops right off with a scraper.

for
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Mike, This was covered a little while back. Melamine is fine. You can take a look at mine at: http://www.amiigas.com/outfeed/outfeed.htm
-- Ed. O.
My woodworking projects at: http://www.amiigas.com Remove the NAIL from e-mail to reply
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Ed,
That's the prettiest zero-clearance insert I've ever seen :-)

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can I use some MDF covered in formica? Thanks Michael
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No - you must use specified outfeed table material. Its all covered in the FAQ. ;)
Dude - use what ever you want to use. As long as its flat and sticks out behind your tablesaw your good to go.

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Absolutely.

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I used melamine. Probably lighter, cheaper, and comes in wider pieces.

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Melamine is just MDF with a lightweght thermofused later on the top and bottom. Not going to be any lighter than the same size and thickness MDF
John
On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 13:47:44 -0800, "Bob Jones"

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John Crea wrote:

I'm not sure where you're finding melamine with an MDF core but you're more than likely to find particleboard being used for the substrate.

Unless it isn't an MDF core.
UA100
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I think that typically it is more like particle board than MDF. I have never seen any melamine that is equivalent in density to MDF. Maybe it exists somewhere...
-Jack

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i often get MDF core melamine-
but only in the 1/4" thickness.
    Bridger
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You mean like this ???
http://home.att.net/~mboceanside/wsb/html/view.cgi-photo.html--SiteID-639331.html
Yes... you may.
HORNNUMB2 wrote:

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Yes, and get a longer wearing, tougher table top than with the melamine
John
On 27 Jan 2004 20:52:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cs.com (HORNNUMB2) wrote:

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On 27 Jan 2004 17:13:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cs.com (HORNNUMB2) wrote:

I used a double layer of 3/4" MDF covered with formica, edged with ash.
Barry
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in message (HORNNUMB2) wrote:

for
Double layer?
Why? as a theft deterrent? That is potential theves would get a hernia an give up.
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I use basically the same. A double layer of M3/4" MDF. Why ?
- Added structural stability.     If I am putting a track (miter or t-slot) into the top, then I have only 3/16 to 1/4" of material at the bottom of the board. This could be potentially across the length (or depth or both)of the piece. Knowing that in a spanned structure, the bottom of the span is in tension, and thus the top could deflect,this slot area then becomes the area of greatest potential failure. And yes I know that an aluminum track will help prevent this, but I do not want to test that.
- Give mass to the top.     This allows the top to help stabilize the work area. Of course this also means that when it gets moving it has more mass for momentum.
- The 'Tim the tool man" syndrome.     Bigger and heavier is better! ARGGG! ARGGG! ARGGG!
- Longevity     Do it once,and overdesign by at least 50%. Look at all the old churches in Europe. They took 600 years to build, but 700 years later they are still standing. I want my work tops to last at least 40 years, because I do not want to have to build a new one when I am 70.
Just my humble, but annoying opinion !
Jerry
Stephen M wrote:

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FYI, a good, inexpensive source for double thick MDF is at resturant supply business', they often stock used equipment, more specifically table tops and bases. The tops are generally 1 1/2" or better and laminated, although maybe not a very appealing color or pattern. :) They make great outfeet surfaces, router table tops, etc. The bottoms usually have a sort of MDO paper layer to seal up the surface which might explain why they stay to nice and straight while being exposed to so much liquid. The last one I got already had oak banding around the edges.
David

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Thanks for the info. I will be sure to look into it the next time.....
Bannerstone wrote:

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