Table Saw dust collection questions

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I bought a Jet 3hp cabinet saw back in September. The saw is connected to a Jet 1100 CK DC. The DC does a fine job of collecting the dust from the other machines in the shop, but the dust in the cabinet of the table saw just settles there and requires me to turn on the DC and get on my hands and knees to move the dust in the cabinet to the 4" opening by hand pretty often. It's made no difference as to the legnth of the run to the DC either, I've had it down to 6' and the dust still settles. Anyway, it's my mission this week to figure something out that will prevent this from happening. Questions for the group: Anyone else have poor dust collection on their cabinet saw? What kind/brand TS and what cfm DC are you using? Any other details how you fixed the problem would also be helpful. I have a few ideas to fix the problem, and will be "field testing" them this week to see if any really work. Thanks, --dave.
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wrote:

Yes. But a shop-made overhead "guard" helps keep the topside cleaner. My guard is based on a Woodcentral.com article.

General 650, Jet DC100CK, with a home run of pipe specifically for the saw..

I now ignore the dust inside the saw and have moved on... <G>
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Thanks for the fast reply! I added an overhead guard w/Dc a few months ago. It did help, but hasn't stopped the cabinet from filling up. --dave

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What happens if you just leave it alone? My contractor's saw has some sawdust that has accumulated around the sides, but it acts as a dam to funnel the new stuff to the dc inlet. It does not get any bigger that what is already there. I suspect you have the same situation.
Given the aerodynamics of a saw cabinet, it is not possible to grab every little bit of dust that gets under the top. Once you get to the level of equilibrium, it will get it as it flows. Try just leaving it alone for a while.
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The inlet on my saw is on the side of the cabinet. The floor of the cabinet is sloped toward the inlet, and, in theory, should funnel the dust to the inlet. However, it just doesn't work. I've opened the motor cover to find the dust is a foot deep except just in front of the inlet. I'm kind of concerned, as it has been deep enough to pack around the motor. I don't expect it to pickup all the dust, but the amount left in the cabinet after a small project can nearly fill my 30 gal separator on the DC! The table saw is the weak link in my effort to get the most out of the DC. I guess I'm on a mission to create a simple solution that will at least prevent the dust from building up so much in the cabinet. Thanks, --dave Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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wrote:

There are usually lots of holes/spaces inside a cabinet saw that decreases the DC effectiveness. You can try sealing up some of the spaces. I made two plugs, made from pieces of foam glued to fiberboard. These plugs fit into the tilt and blade riser slots and helped a lot. Of course, these plugs fall out if you move the blade too much, but the tilt remains in place most of the time. You might also consider putting a slant board inside the cabinet that tilts toward the DC port. Overall, there are more nooks and crannies inside a cabinet table saw than other machines. I hand clean mine out a few times a year.
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Plugging up all the holes was my first failed attempt, and an exercise in futility. I duct taped most of the outside openings, except the slot in the front for the tilt. I soon realised there are many holes between the top of the cabinet and the bottom castings on the table, many I can almost put my hand through. I considerd spray foaming these, but think there must be a better, simpler solution. I even considered sealing off everything in the cabinet and adding some holes in the cabinet opposite the DC port to provide sort of a "jet stream" for makeup air to blow across the bottom of the cabinet and into the DC port, but haven't had the guts to drill holes in my new saw cabinet (yet). The cabinet already has a floor that tilts toward the DC port, but has not proved effective at all. --dave Phisherman wrote:

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You have to have air flow. Plugging too many holes will hinder you more than help. Plug all the holes and you will collect no dust.
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Leon, your probably right, I may be getting a little AR here, I just thought I could come up with a simple solution that would work at least reasonably well. Your right about plugging all the holes though. The DC does need make up air to move sawdust. My challenge has been focusing the makeup air to carry the sawdust to the DC port. The way the saw is designed now, the makeup air comes from all the openings at the top of the cabinet and flows to the DC port without picking up all the dust at the floor of the cabinet along the way. I'm thinking if the makeup air could come from below the dust pile, or just across the top of the floor of the saw, it should be able to carry most of the dust out of the machine. --dave Leon wrote:

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I think you are on to something there, but it may require you to hole saw a couple of holes in the cabinet of your saw. Right above the floor would be my answer. I have a Deltas contractors saw. I covered the back of the saw at first, but later removed the cover and saw no difference in the dust collection. Not a single opening is covered on my saw and I bet it recovers 90% of the dust. The rest only an over arm guard would get. You need air flow to keep the dust moving. Greg
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If you insist on this,;~) you may consider plugging the upper end holes and drill holes in the bottom shelf, put the holes where the dust is going to end up. I did serious wood working for 28+ years with out a dust collector. I am very happy with the dust collector and not having to scoop the dust out any more. Since the dust is contained and easy to empty now I really don't care if the collector gets it all. It does very well with the 15" stationary planer and my BS, two of my biggest creators of nuisance dust.
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wait until you get that Performax sander running, talk about nuisance dust. I made the mistake of not opening the dc vent to my drum sander (has two 4" dc ports) once and it was an instant dust cloud.
and to the OP, I have an Oneida 3HP system that still leaves dust in the Unisawr.
Gary
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LOL. I bet. On a better note, the collector bag does not fill as fast as with the planer. ;~)
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I used some of those magnetic sheets -- little ones are used for refrigerator magnets. You can strategically place these to cove the tilt and riser slots (well 90%). Seems to work ok -- and they are easily moved when you need to tilt the saw.

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I think you are being a bit AR here. I have the exact same machines, dust collects in the saw not the shop and who cares from there. It beats scooping the saw out with a dust pan.
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"Leon" wrote in message

Sawdust! ... from sawing wood in a woodshop!?
I mean, Lord have mercy ... what's the world coming to when things aren't perfect, like they are on TV?

My Unisaw does a pretty decent job of funneling the sawdust to the port, but every once in a great while I have to invoke my patented "two stage" dust collection system:
... poke a stick down its throat and coax some of it toward its doom.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/25/06
  Click to see the full signature.
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I've been in the shop most of the day so far trying out different ideas to make the TS dust collection work and I think I've come up with something that just may be the ticket. Although I don't want to go into to much detail yet, results seem promising but it definately needs refined. Once I get it to work better, I'll post the results. On the plus side, the contraption could be made easily with some scraps, it won't require sealing any holes in the cabinet, and could possibly be adapted to work well on contractor saws. So far, I've been able to dump 20 gallons of sawdust through the throat and the DC has picked up nearly all of it. However, I haven't actually tried it with the saw in use yet. If nothing else, I may just adopt swingman's patented system. Plenty of sticks around here to use! :) --dave
Swingman wrote:

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Dumping down the throat is a bit different than having a spinning blade toss around the dust. Unless the motor is getting buried, leave well enough alone.
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Yea, I've been pretty close to burying the motor completely. This is kinda whay I started experimenting with it today. So far, I've been able to effectively remove 20 gal of dust from the machine by poring the dust down the throat in less than 10 minutes time with only a couple of handfulls of dust left in the cabinet. (I did clog the whole thing up by dumping a whole 3 gallon bucket down there at once, but that is way more dust than the blade could create in a few seconds anyway.) In theory, this is working! It's just been easier to try and mimic creating gallons of dust by pouring it down there rather than ripping up a bunch of wood just for testing. However, I think I'm in the ballpark close enough now to try testing it by ripping some stock, so in a few minutes I'm gonna fire up the TS to see what happens for real. This may sound silly, but I think what I've created is just a small downdraft system that fits into the saw cabinet and directs the makeup air to pickup the dust on the way to the port. Simple concept, but it's working!! I'll report back soon with real world results. --dave
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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