Table saw blade sharpening advice???

I must have 15 table saw blades of various sizes and designs. Is it practical for me to learn how to sharpen them or should I just keep buying new ones???? Some are carbide tipped and some are not. What tools would be required. How do you test for sharpness? I can feel the cutting difference when I put a new blade in but when comparing two older blades, how can I tell which is sharper.
TIA
Steve
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This is something best done on a very expensive, computer controlled machine, by someone who knows what to look for. If you can find a local one, you're doubly lucky.
Considering that each blade will cost you an average of less than $20 each, carry-in, it's a really good deal. And the counter person will look at your blades, and tell you what you should take back unsharpened.
At least mine does.
There was a thread a couple of years ago on local recommended sharpening services, wherein a lot of wReckers recommended good ones.
Consider that the tip speed of your 10" table saw blade is close to 100 mph, running at about 4000 rpm.
7" framing blades are generally disposable.
Patriarch
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Forget about not carbide blades and send the rest to Forest Blade for sharpenning if they are in good condition, this is what I would do, they sharp them so good that it will be betther than new. MaxEN
Steve wrote:

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difference
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The non carbide are usually throw aways. The carbide can be sharpened. Check the prices at www.ridgecarbidetool.com for information. If t hey are good blades, you will save a bundle having them resharpened.
This is not a DIY job as they use special equipment and the angles are very precise.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
...

Actually, it can be a DIY job with carbide blades, and the results are as good as the person doing the sharpening, as a rule. I forget the material, but you put the blade in backwards and set a jig over it to slide a sharpening tool up against it as it runs. Works well except for specialty blades of course, 'cause it's going to give you flat-topped teeth, but since that's what most cutoff/rip/plywood blades are ... . I've had some pretty respectable results with it over the years.
Pop
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Are you saying that you sharpen the blade as it's spinning with the motor on?
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Mon, Feb 14, 2005, 9:48pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@123.com (mp) says: Are you saying that you sharpen the blade as it's spinning with the motor on?
That's the way I read it too. But, that would only square the ends of the carbide tips, it wouldn't sharpen the rest of the carbide tip. I don't see it substituting for a "real" sharpening. I also don't see me doing anything like that with a turning saw blade. I'd be willing to do HSS myself - filing by hand, with the blade out of the saw, and in a vise, no prob - but, any carbide tipped blades, I'd give over to a saw sharpener to sharpen.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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I hope you continue to get good results. If my interpretation is correct, you run the blade on the saw backwards and then bring a sharpening jig in to touch against it. Sounds rather scary to me. I'll pay the $15, but you can do what you think is best.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I think what the op is talking about is commonly called jointing a saw. All that does is make sure the saw teeth are at the same level so the bottom of a saw cut will be flat. Not real important unless you are using it to make dadoes. It might make the saw a bit sharper but I don't think you can sharpen the saw that way.
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On Wed, 16 Feb 2005 00:31:44 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Check out Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking under Circular-Saw Blades, page 21. The purpose of the stone use while the saw is running is to make a true circle of the blade points.
He shows a steel blade sharpening process but recommends sending a carbide blade to a professional.
Thunder
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Rolling Thunder wrote:

Yep, that's called truing the blade or jointing the teeth. I don't see how that sharpens the teeth other than taking small nicks out. But then I don't have the book. I would just let my sharpener guy handle all the angle cuts on the teeth.
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Visual inspection with a hand magnifier or loupe will soon reveal whether the edges are rounded/chipped.
Jeff G
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How do you test for sharpness? I can feel the cutting difference

To test for sharpness, try carving your thumbnail with the edge of the blade's teeth. If you're unable to carve your thumbnail, have the blade sharpened. Try this with a new, sharp blade and compare. You'll note the difference.
Thunder
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I recommend having a professional sharpen your blades - at least th
carbide ones for sure. There is probably a shop in your town tha sharpens saw blades (I used to live in a town of 3500 and we even ha one).
Regarding high speed steel saw blades, it can be worth it to have the sharpened - especially for dado sets. I have a dado set that inherited from my Granddad that is close to 60 years old - my loca saw shop keeps it sharp for me and it works great.
These places can also sharpen carbide router bits - I think that m local place charges $5 or $7 for a bit with two cutting edges.
On a somewhat unrelated note, when changing saw blades on your tabl saw don't use a block of wood to wedge the blade in place when removin the nut - you can warp your saw blade...instead, to loosen the nut hi the wrench with a block of wood or wooden mallet while holding th sawblade with your hand and a rag. It takes a little practice, bu it's worth it to avoid damaging an expensive blade.
Regards,
Scot
-- makesawdust
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