table saw

Can anyone please recommend a good table saw for making somewhat decent furniture?
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There's a bunch to choose from. Depends on room , portability , whether you want to do a lot of ripping. Average thickness of wood. In my opinion a good blade is one important thing. Jamffer
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Do a Google search on this newsgroup. This has been discussed many times over.
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Personally, I think it's important to realize that one needs a whole LOT more than a tablesaw to make good furniture.
Old Guy

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I'd go that one further and say that for furniture you don't need one at all... unless you're using sheet goods. A bandsaw, or rip and cross cut handsaws, a rip back saw and hand planes will do ya for dimensioning and straightening an edge. ;~)
...of course having other handtools would be needed too but such would be the case with a tablesaw too.
John
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Old guy wrote:

Not to mention a bit of skill.
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I think it's even more importantto realize that no matter how many tools you have, it takes skill and experience to make good furniture, just having the tools won't do it. Expecting to magically create something wonderful right out of the gate is just setting yourself up for disappointment. It won't happen.
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I've seen some really nice furniture made on a ShopSmith but it wasn't from mine. The guy I'm thinking of was meticuous about set, calibration and patience. Start with a price range and repost. You're likely to get a better response. In any event, be safe.
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C & E wrote:

As with any other tool? <G>
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Actually, with a Shopsmith, more so...
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Try looking at the Grizzly tools. Good basic tools at a decent price. I have the 1023 and find no real problems with it except it accumulates a lot of saw dust.
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Any one that cost from about $800 and up from Delta, Jet, Grizzly, General. Many styles to choose from. Next is to get a good blade for it from Ridge Carbide, Infinity Tools, Forrest, etc. Figure $50 to $120. You also need some skill that has to be acquired from practice. If you don't know how to use the saw, even a $2500 will not work well for you.
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"newby woodworker" wrote:

As someone else suggested, start looking around the $800 mark.
Anything less and you will be unhappy in short order.
Lew
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Find a contractors saw with a cast iron top. No aluminum!!
Mine works well for me (could use a smidge more power) and I have made a bunch of "somewhat decent furniture".
Ignore the tool snobs that think you need to drop a $K on a saw.
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/shop_workhorse.htm
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Troll?
http://groups.google.com/group/roses/browse_frm/thread/5f65a493c3258123/678ce6899eae42cc#678ce6899eae42cc
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On 1 May 2007 13:51:29 -0700, newby woodworker

How much $$$? A cabinet saw is better than a contractor's saw. Look for one with a large cast table, dust collection, heavy triunion, excellent fence. Stay away from benchtop models (unless you are making doll furniture.) Top of the line: PM 6 (USA) or General (Canada).
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Since budget isn't an issue I'd recommend a Sawstop hands down.
newby woodworker wrote:

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With any saw, you have to watch where you put your hands down.
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Not on a seesaw.
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Stoutman wrote:

You've never seen someone hold on to the seat behind them while riding? They only did it once though. Joe
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