Strong enough?

I'm pretty sure it will be, but ...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12587012595/in/set-72157639547178715/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12590534784/in/set-72157639547178715/
My wife would like a long (essentially wall-to wall) shelf to put some seldom-used but decorative serving pieces on. This should free up some space in the cabinets too. I originally planned on a simple shelf with wrought-iron brackets, but decided instead to make supports that could hold coffee mugs as well. The unit would straddle a window.
The above design (or something like it a few iterations back) has passed muster with my wife. Now I'm wondering about the "engineering". This shelf unit would be mounted on a wall which is plaster laminated on brick. I've drawn in some anchors in their approximate position (let's leave aside how I would hide them for now) in the "backs" of the supports.
The backs would be inset and screwed into the top shelf and the curved sides - probably screwed in straight through from the top (the top shelf of the unit will be about 7' up, and thus will never be seen by anyone likely to enter my house) and with pocket screws from the back into the side pieces. And glue.
So I have two questions:
1. Does that sound like solid enough fastening between the "backs" (the only part directly attached to the wall) and the rest of the unit?
2. Does the "trigonometry" work? Meaning, an 8" high "bracket" for a 12" deep shelf? I don't want to drag the anchors out of the wall.
P.S.: The keen observer may notice that I have been drawing a great many different things without actually getting on with building any of them. My "shop", such as it is, is less accessible than usual the last few weeks. Persistent snow piles on our street have made it difficult to move a certain large four-wheeled obstacle out of the way in order to work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 9:23 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I wouldn't hesitate, as drawn and securely fastened.
I might mention to the wife, out of an abundance of precaution, to try keep the heavier items off the middle (50lb worth of pot plants), knowing that it is more than likely OK in any event.
The good thing: You made it. If there is a problem, you can fix it.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 9:34 AM, Swingman wrote:

Forgot to mention, and this is mostly personal preference:
I would dado the shelf bottoms into the curved shelf supports; as well as dado the curved shelf supports into the bottom of the shelf; then apply your edging.
The first gives you a cleaner look from the sides, and together they make for a much more rigid structure.
Rigidity throughout the components of long shelf is a good thing.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 10:45 AM, Swingman wrote:

I like dadoes. Beyond any structural advantage, they assure that I have the pieces in proper alignment during the glue-up. It's pretty obvious how to join the shelf supports to the upper shelf, but less so where the supports meet the bottom shelf. Is this what you envision?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12611769314/in/set-72157639547178715/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12611451743/in/set-72157639547178715/
I can think of several other possibilities. I do like this one, partly because I think I can build it. :):
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/18/2014 9:09 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Actually, I was thinking more along the lines of a "stopped dado" in the Curved End Panels for that bottom shelf to reside in, somewhere along this line:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#5981818576606766610
Mainly because it would give you a more finished, 'furniture like' look on the curved end panels of the bottom shelves, and still provide strength, especially if you pin the joints with a contrasting wood/dowel/pin.
Either way will work, though.
Most folks with your time level invested in woodworking usually rely on someone else's plans to make anything at all - you're well past them in that regard.
So take it up a notch, stretch yourself a bit and tackle stopped dadoes if you haven't already done so. Doing so will only improve your skills, and ultimately the end product of your designs. ;)
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/18/2014 2:37 PM, Swingman wrote:

I figured that a "stopped dado" would eventually enter the discussion. :)

This project's "lesson" was supposed to be using a router and template to cut (actually "clean up" - after jigsawing a little outside of the line) the four curved supports. A stopped dado would mean two "lessons".

I think we can chalk that up partly to arrogance and having a small house. Most everything I have built or intend to build is meant to store and/or display things efficiently, space-wise. The things I see in wood magazines are nice for inspiration, but they never quite fit. Besides, some part of me always figures I have a better idea, despite ample evidence to the contrary. :)
I also get to design for what I think I can build, and sometimes, to try a new technique.

It's true, when all you have is a hammer ... every design looks like a nail.
I haven't tried a stopped dado since high school. In fact, I seem to remember making the entire dado (two, in fact) by hand. I believe we hand-sawed the long edges, chiseled the end line and used a two-handled router plane to plow out the waste.
If I decide to go the stopped-dado route, I guess I would simply need to chisel the rounded corners square after routing out the dado. I'll consider it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might want to consider using a sliding dovetail to join the sides to the top. They are easy to make and give you a mechanical join, not ever going to come apart.
For the bottom - as Karl suggested - a stoped dado in the side would be better. Even better IMO would be a stopped rabbet with a matching tongue at the top edge of the bottom's sides.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 10:34 AM, Swingman wrote:

I'd keep the pot plants in the basement. Can't trust the neighbors if they spot them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/17/2014 10:34 AM, Swingman wrote:

There won't be any plants up there, especially "pot" plants. No books either, just empty crockery. But I hadn't really paid attention to how long the span would be: 44". I might consider a cleat underneath the shelf across that span (attached to the wall) so it will never sag.

--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/18/2014 8:58 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

With that front edge on the top shelf, its thickness and the way it is oriented, I doubt seriously that will be an issue.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/18/2014 10:03 AM, Swingman wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes to both but it is tailor made for a couple of French cleats.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.