Storing slightly rusted machinery?

I just picked up a TS and jointer at auction. They're in good shape but the cast iron tops of both are slightly rusted. The problem is I can't restore or use them right away, and the only place I have to store them is in a shed that is not climate-controlled--it's "well ventilated", meaning built w/ dimensional lumber framing, particle board, and metal roof. The ground is slightly sloping gravel.
So far I've put them on 2x4s on the ground.
How can I keep the rust from getting worse (or is that at all possible?) until I can get to cleaning them up?
Anyone have experience in this?
Thanks, H
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Many of us have our tools in unheated shops or garages and share the rust-avoidance problem. You will likely get quite a few suggestions on removal and prevention, so put this on your list.
Clean - If the tops are not heavily rusted, you might be able to rub if off with a scotch brite pad or even coarse steel wool. For heavier rust a medium grit sandpaper (best use a sanding block, with light pressure to keep polishing smooth). If it is really ugly, you might want to start with Naval Gel, but wash all of it off or you'll get staining (I don't like to use it unless rust is really bad).
Protect - I personally use a product called SLIPIT as a protectant. SLIPIT is a non-silicoln contact lube and it does a pretty good job of protecting the top and lubricating the miter gage slots. It is available in spray and brush-on paste from Grizzly and probably from others. At a Grizzly rep's recommendation I use the paste. You just brush it on and wipe it off with a clean rag. I do this 3-4 times a year with tools being used.
Others use automotive paste wax and specialty products. When the tools are in use it is best to shy away from silicoln based products or other products that will leave residue on your lumber.
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I take it you need to store the tools until you can take the time to restore them properly.
I would cover the exposed/unpainted parts with a light grease spray, a white lithium spray, avaliable at most autoparts houses. Using a rag soaked in motor oil, wipe down all other surfaces. Wrap in plastic with a generous amont of desiccant in the plastic. Do not cover them with oily rags or leave the rags in the plastic. Cover them with a tarp.
Dave

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On 1 Nov 2004 08:58:40 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

Easy.
You need a big tub of grease (grease is cheap - big tubs cost the same as small tubs, you just have to go to a more serious shop) and a roll of packaging cling film / saran wrap. This stuff is 12" wide and can be found in better commercial stationers. You'll also need ziploc freezer bags, a big crate (preferably with a lid), a tarpaulin (cheap blue polypropylene) a Polaroid or digital camera and a notebook.
And of course, baler twine.
Photograph all the electrics, the rotating bits, the thing you're about to dismantle etc. Use the notebook for the bits you can't photograph. Note all wiring colours, approximate positions of things you're disconnecting etc. Note the order that washers were placed on dismantled parts, and which hole had the odd long bolt in it.
Place all the small things into ziploc bags and label them. Don't mix them all together, keep the bolts from the grockle flange separate from those off the motor mount -- later on you'll find out that one set was actually 2mm longer and they don't interchange after all.
Photocopy your notes. Put one set away neatly. Now, because you're never going to find that set ever again, seal the other set in a waterproof ziploc bag and store it with the other parts. All the motors, handles, ziploc bags, notes etc. now go into the crate. If possible, you now tie-wrap the lid onto this crate so that it can't be opened.
Now the machinery. Use the cling film wrap to seal up air vents etc. on motors or switchgear, or anything that doesn't like grease. Slather a thin layer of grease onto all exposed machined and unpainted metalwork. This needs to be rubbed in well (no missed areas) but it doesn't need to be thick. The best grease is Cosmoline, which you can't get hold of. Next best is thick grease for tractor nuggin-boxes, but that's no use for anything else. As you might as well get something useful around the workshop, I suggest you just get a tin of typical lithium grease. Now use more cling film to wrap the greased parts. This stops your workshop being filled with a greasy monster, but it also stops the grease getting wiped off and leaving the surface exposed, or filling with sawdust and turning into a damp rust-inducing poultice.
Stack the pile neatly. Apply foam pipe lagging or old carpet around any projecting knee-skewers, held in place with baler twine. Learn to tie a constrictor knot. Put the tarp over the top, and Gulliver it down with more baler twine.
Later on, remove the wrapping with knife, scissors and kerosene.
More information on the preservative properties of cling film can be found at Sarah Hotdesking's (a regular on sci.military.naval) site: http://www.shartwell.freeserve.co.uk/humor-site/clingfilm.html
--
Smert' spamionam

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in message

Ouch! Got wrapped up in a bad 70's flashback there. Stevie Nicks redeux.
And thanks for the mammaries, H
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On 2 Nov 2004 07:50:18 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

Well, on thing's for sure. She'll never rust!
--RC "You Know Things Are Weird When Arnold Schwartznegger Is Governor of California, Ronald Reagan Is One Of Our Most Beloved Ex-Presidents, And John Kerry Is Running For President On His Vietnam War Record"
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On 1 Nov 2004 08:58:40 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

At least wipe all the metal parts with a rag dampened with kerosene. Petroleum jelly will work too, although harder to remove. That will hold it for a month or so.
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Thanks a lot guys, you've given some great suggestions.
Since only the tops of these machines are rusted at all, and they're not that bad, I'm going to suck it up and find and extra 3-4 hrs to take the rust off the tops, then use some of your suggestions to store the whole units.
I'd like to avoid disassembly if possible, but I'll be sure to make liberal use of paste wax or similar and grease, then cover with tarps and include a stash of desiccant bags.
Again, thanks, H
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I'd be cautious about putting any water proof covers on machines. As the warm damp moisture rises it is trapped in the waterproof cover underside and creates a "rain" next time the air cools.
Don Dando

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